1950 Chevy Fleetline sports a blown-six!

Larry and Judy Brewer are a retired couple living in Benton, Kentucky, and much earlier in Larry’s 75 years on earth he owned a four-door Chevy Fleetline. In fact, it was his first car and, even though he has been into customizing cars all his life, he has always wanted a custom 1950 Fleetline—this time a two-door.

He was able to locate a good, stock candidate at a local auction but, at the time being 70 years old, thought this project (which was going to be a handful due to Larry’s desire to chop the Chevy’s fastback roof) might best be tackled by someone a bit younger and with more experience customizing cars, and luckily he was able to find Brad Starks.

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As it turns out, there are all types of “builders” out in the world who claim they can do this or that, but Starks is the real deal. If you spend 20 minutes rolling through his photo albums on Facebook, you can clearly see the guy not only understands hot rod history, but is equally adept at doing something contemporary as well. What’s more, Starks can seamlessly blend the two together, which is the hardest trick of them all.

Working out of his 4,500-square-foot Brad Starks Rod & Custom shop in Paducah, Kentucky, over the past seven years, Starks has created all sorts of hot rods and mild customs, often doing 98 percent of the metal fabrication and bodywork himself. One of the most acclaimed vehicles he built was the Goodguys’ Custom of the Year in 2009, a 1950 Chevy tin woodie with incredible wood graining down its side. But Starks not only likes chopping mid-’50s Chevys, but he’s built some mighty fine pickups, and laid down some striking paintjobs on a few Harleys.

1950-chevy-fastback-brewer-engine-overview

Having a knowledgeable background in most every type of ’50s cars gives you a great base to work from when customizing a car. And even though you may not know exactly how something is going to fit once transplanted from one make or year to another, you do know it’s going to look awesome when it’s done!

Stark’s approach on Brewer’s Chevy was to combine a bit of new technology with some old-fashioned cutting and fabricating to create a one-off that Larry would be proud to drive his wife around in. The work began with obtaining an Art Morrison GT Sport 2×4 chassis, which Brad modified a little to accept the proposed inline six-cylinder (more on that motor idea later).

The chassis would be fitted with a Ford 9-inch Posi rear (3.70:1) and 31-spline Strange axles. The rest was fairly straightforward, with a triangulated four-link out back, an Art Morrison IFS up front, and antiroll bars front and rear. Coilover shocks are found on each corner, as are Wilwood disc brakes (12-inch fore, 11-inch aft). Steering components include a Flaming River box and a 1950 Pontiac column modified by Starks, and fuel capacity was increased with a high-capacity stainless tank from Chevs of the 40’s. To give the car a more contemporary look, Wheel Smith billet artillery wheels (17×7 and 17×8) are wrapped in Kumho 225/55ZR-17 and 245/50ZR-17 hides, and were topped with 1957 Chevy truck hubcaps to provide that “bullet” look found on many customs.

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When it comes to an engine to power this custom, Brad and Larry could have gone with a new powerplant that offered the confidence that only computerized accuracy can deliver, or they could go crazy and build something wild like a blown inline-six. Luckily, they decided on the latter.

Because it was going to be so unique, Starks turned to a couple of specialists for this engine: Kelley’s Machine in Union City, Tennessee, and Lowell Grooms. Kelly’s did the machine work on the 1966 250-incher, adding 0.040-over hypereutectic pistons and a COMP Cams H268 camshaft, and the heads were milled 0.010 before stainless steel valves were installed. Topping the block is a custom valve cover from Starks that basically uses a stock 216 cover that sits over the 250 valve cover—making the engine look older (and therefore smaller) than it really is.

The blower and intake were in Grooms’ wheelhouse. He knew the system worked—he’d had a nearly identical setup in his 1932 roadster that he campaigned at Goodguys autocross events with great success. Lowell took an Eaton M90 blower off a ’90s-era 3.8L V-6, and built the aluminum intake for the Edelbrock 600 carb by hand (with the end product running on 8 pounds of boost) and the unique belt system as well.

1950-chevy-fastback-brewerfront-end

Grooms also fab’d the header system, and Starks made the air cleaner and the rest of the exhaust system (utilizing Sonic Turbo mufflers in the process). Dual electric fans keep the aluminum radiator running cool, and the whole shebang mates to a Gearstar 200-4R automatic transmission and a Wiles Driveshaft.

While the chassis and drivetrain were going together, Starks was also busy with the car’s body. The most striking feature of the Chevy was also the hardest to achieve: the 3-inch chop. Bring the roofline down and making the rear section flow into the taillight area correctly is where the magic needed to take place. The original taillights were tiny and fit upright and flush against the area between the trunk and peak of the fender. But Starks’ idea was to use nearly horizontal 1959 Corvette taillights and, for added impact, made the driver side assembly hinge and pop up to reveal the location of the gas filler.

Add to that swapping in a set of 1955 Olds headlights, modifying the grille (removing the teeth) and its opening, using a curved one-piece windshield from a 1950 Oldsmobile instead of the original split Chevy unit, and re-arch the rear fenderwells. Door handles from a 1950 Olds were also installed, and the hood, which used to be two-piece, was welded together, reshaped, and peaked. The rear bumper came from a 1955 Chevy before being welded up and smoothed out, and the front is a 1950 Chevy bumper but Starks added the accessory ends and modified its shape to fit under the modified front fenders. The chrome on the car came from two shops: Perfection Plating in Nashville and Brown’s Plating Service in Paducah, Kentucky.

More metal fabrication is found inside the car, where a dash from a 1950 Pontiac Silver Streak hardtop was grafted into the Chevy’s confines. The Pontiac’s gauges were rebuilt at Auto Instruments in Martinsville, Virginia; though the original clock in the middle of the speaker grille still looks like a clock, it’s actually a tachometer. The stock speaker grille is now home to the Vintage Air A/C vents, and a Kenwood CD sound system (installed by Jeremy and the gang at J’s Rod & Custom Interiors in McKenzie, Tennessee) has been mounted in the trunk. Once the metalwork was finished, the car rolled into Stark’s paint booth where it received several coats of RM’s Tuscan Sun that is found on some 2012 Nissan Maximas.

J’s also handled the interior’s upholstery needs, using 1963 Impala seats and covering everything with a gray and white leather combo while opting for a cranberry suede headliner. Gray German square-weave carpet went in below, which contrasts the lighter gray color on the lower dash section.

Once completed, Larry was more than happy to drive it around to local shows, and he’s even picked up a few awards with it, including a Pro’s Pick and another at the Shades of the Past Hot Rod Roundup. And thanks to the crew at Brad Starks Rod & Custom, Larry has the custom he’s always wanted.

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Interesting Stuff

All I Want for Christmas is this 6×6 Jeep Rubicon!

It isn’t going to fit under the Christmas tree. But if you have an extra $375,000 to buy this beast, you likely have a great garage to put it in. This thing is a 2017 Jeep Rubicon that has been stretched for a 6-foot truck bed and an extra axle in the rear, and plumbed with a 6.4L Hemi. It’s a creation of Matt Hunt, owner of MHMC near Huntington Beach, California. He’s responsible for the Affliction Chevelle and a host of lifted, sparkly, Jeeps and trucks that fit the Orange County lifestyle of wretched excess.

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This one is called the Poison Tree Frog, were guessing because of the paint. Kawasaki hues aside, the engineering work allows for a new Hemi to be mated to a Mercedes Benz five-speed automatic. There are two driveshafts. The first one runs to a CV joint on a Ford 9-inch, and a second connects a rear facing CV joint to the factory Dana, for a functioning 6×6 wheel drive.

Matt blew the entire Jeep apart, cut and extended the frame by a mile, lifted the body and fabricated a functioning pass-through 6-foot bed. It sits on Fuel wheels and 35s.

Incredibly, this is the second 6×6 Jeep Matt has built. The first one went to a company called Wild Bore Off Road in Huntington Beach. This one was built for the Garansindo Group, which owns FCA dealerships in Indonesia. If you need one, a 6×6 Rubicon can be built in six months to order, with a Hellcat engine if you want.

Source: hotrod.com
Posted in Interesting Stuff

How to Make 600-horsepower with a Vintage Y Block Engine.

Making an engine designed circa-1950 produce over four times its original horsepower output is tough. Taking that same engine and winning the 2016 AMSOIL Engine Masters Challenge Presented by HOT ROD –– now that’s even harder. Ted Eaton accomplished that exact feat with his Mercury Y Block engine, churning out class-winning peaks of 603.2 horsepower and 565.5 lb-ft of torque, a far cry from what the original designers ever could have thought possible. How did he do it? Ingenuity, a whole lot of testing and development time, and of course help from teammates Fred Hertzog, Lonnie Putnam, Jody Orsag, and Steve Culp.

We asked Eaton with all of the engine architectures legal for Engine Master’s Vintage class, what is the allure of a Y-block? “I ran them growing up, and they always ran good,” he said. “In the early 2000s, I saw someone run mid 10s with one. A buddy of mine looked at me and said, ‘we oughta’ be able to outrun that.’”

In addition to growing up around Ys, Eaton has been building them for competition, first in his drag car and later for dyno racing, since 2000, and 2016 marks his fourth time competing at AMSOIL Engine Masters. “We entered the Engine Masters challenge in 2009 with a goal not to be in last place,” he said. “Out of 30 engines running that year, we came in 29th. Life was good.”

Ted’s highly developed engine combination displaces 375ci courtesy of a 4-inch-stroke, billet Moldex crank and a 3.860-inch bore filled with Diamond pistons. The Total Seal ring pack consists of a 1.00mm top ring, 1.2mm second ring, and 3.00mm third ring, a huge departure from what the Y-series would have originally packed. Topping the mill is a set of Mummert cylinder heads with 1.970/1.540-inch intake valves and a Mummert F.I. intake manifold that Eaton completely reworked to accept dual 4-barrel carbs.

What is really surprising about Eaton’s engine is how much remains of the original design such as the unique, stacked intake port configuration and the oiling system needed very little updating to handle the massive power increase. “Oiling is pretty good,” said Eaton. “The only problem is all the oil for the top end is pulled off the center cam bearing. I machine a groove in the block so no matter what happens with the bearing, I still get oil to the top end.”

Introduced in 1954, the Ford Y-block was rated at a measly 130 horsepower. Ted Eaton’s Mercury Y-block cranked out 603.2 horsepower, nearly 4.5-times the original output!
Introduced in 1954, the Ford Y-block was rated at a measly 130 horsepower. Ted Eaton’s Mercury Y-block cranked out 603.2 horsepower, nearly 4.5-times the original output!
The rotating assembly of Eaton’s Y consists of a 4-inch stroke Moldex crank cut for tiny, Honda-size rod journals. Eaton tells us the crank and cam centerline are too close on the Y-block, limiting stroke considerably, before taking more creative measures that he hints will be a part of his next Engine Masters build. A set of custom, billet caps with 6-bolts holds the crank firmly in place and cleverly incorporates the rear main seal into the rear cap, eliminating the factory seal retainer.
The rotating assembly of Eaton’s Y consists of a 4-inch stroke Moldex crank cut for tiny, Honda-size rod journals. Eaton tells us the crank and cam centerline are too close on the Y-block, limiting stroke considerably, before taking more creative measures that he hints will be a part of his next Engine Masters build. A set of custom, billet caps with 6-bolts holds the crank firmly in place and cleverly incorporates the rear main seal into the rear cap, eliminating the factory seal retainer.
The unconventional stacked intake ports are a surefire way to spot a Y-block. The heads on Eaton’s engine were produced by Mummert and are CNC ported and angle milled 1.5-degrees for improved airflow. Eaton also had the spark plug location moved up 4mm to better centralize it in the chamber. “The flame doesn’t have to move all the way to the other side of the cylinder to do its job, which improves the flame propagation,” he said. The heads also use a modern beehive valvespring to reduce valvetrain mass.
The unconventional stacked intake ports are a surefire way to spot a Y-block. The heads on Eaton’s engine were produced by Mummert and are CNC ported and angle milled 1.5-degrees for improved airflow. Eaton also had the spark plug location moved up 4mm to better centralize it in the chamber. “The flame doesn’t have to move all the way to the other side of the cylinder to do its job, which improves the flame propagation,” he said. The heads also use a modern beehive valvespring to reduce valvetrain mass.
This gorgeous set of Mercury valve covers really set Eaton’s motor apart form other Y engines in competition. They are the handiwork of Australian manufacturer, Y bloke. Under those valvecovers are shaft-mounted Mummert rockers, working off of an Isky camshaft. Duration for the cam specs in at 256/260 degrees at .050-inches and the lobe separation angle is an extremely tight 102 degrees. The tight LSA helps compress the power and torque bands into the competition’s scoring range for maximum points.
This gorgeous set of Mercury valve covers really set Eaton’s motor apart form other Y engines in competition. They are the handiwork of Australian manufacturer, Y bloke. Under those valvecovers are shaft-mounted Mummert rockers, working off of an Isky camshaft. Duration for the cam specs in at 256/260 degrees at .050-inches and the lobe separation angle is an extremely tight 102 degrees. The tight LSA helps compress the power and torque bands into the competition’s scoring range for maximum points.
The Dynatech headers for this combination have a 1.75-inch primary tube with a 4-into-1 design that Eaton borrowed from John Kaase, last year’s AMSOIL Engine Masters Vintage winner.
The Dynatech headers for this combination have a 1.75-inch primary tube with a 4-into-1 design that Eaton borrowed from John Kaase, last year’s AMSOIL Engine Masters Vintage winner.
Believe it or not, it was a set of old, 660cfm Holley center-squirters that were the magic ingredient for power. “We were having trouble with carburetors, so we grabbed a pair of 40-year-old center-squirters. We just stuck ‘em on there and Bingo,” said Eaton. While originally mounted inline, the carbs were turned sideways to facilitate jet changes during competition.
Believe it or not, it was a set of old, 660cfm Holley center-squirters that were the magic ingredient for power. “We were having trouble with carburetors, so we grabbed a pair of 40-year-old center-squirters. We just stuck ‘em on there and Bingo,” said Eaton. While originally mounted inline, the carbs were turned sideways to facilitate jet changes during competition.
Dual 4-barrel carburetors are great at equalizing airflow to each cylinder, the only downside is that 4 bowls and 8 jets need to come out every time you need to make fueling change. Fortunately, crewmembers Fred Hertzog, Lonnie Putnam, Jody Orsag, and Steve Culp were adept at jet-swaps, accomplishing several in the 30-minute window of competition.
Dual 4-barrel carburetors are great at equalizing airflow to each cylinder, the only downside is that 4 bowls and 8 jets need to come out every time you need to make fueling change. Fortunately, crewmembers Fred Hertzog, Lonnie Putnam, Jody Orsag, and Steve Culp were adept at jet-swaps, accomplishing several in the 30-minute window of competition.

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Interesting Stuff

How To Get Show-Car Paint—And The Right Custom Color!

Most car guys have been in the spot we are in right now. There’s always that one project that seems to take forever to complete—or in our case, to merely keep moving forward. You might think that being knee-deep in the industry would make building a car easier, but it doesn’t, and often times it makes it harder. So with my weak, thinly-veiled excuse for the absence of good ol’ Project 50 out of the way, we can now get to the business of laying down some color. But first a quick recap: the goal of this project was to turn a basketcase 1969 Dodge Charger into a 50-state legal, ground-pounding, tire-shredding monster with all modern drivetrain and suspension components while retaining the flavor and style that made the car so popular more than 40 years ago. Months of “rough-in” work was performed with 50 percent of the raw metal on the car being replaced before it made the trip to The Finer Details in Danville, Indiana. Shop owner Ken Mosier is well-known around the industry for producing award-winning restorations, so choosing the shop that would finish the Charger was easy.

Once our Charger finally got to Indiana, the crew at The Finer Details would spend countless hours on body work to ensure that the body was p-e-r-f-e-c-t before one drop of color was applied. When it comes to color it turns out there is a story there too. The color of this car has changed at least half a dozen times before a phone conversation between your author and Mosier when he suggested Dodge’s new OE color “Jazz Blue Pearl,” a rich, dark pearlescent blue that bordered on midnight blue. After seeing the color on a Charger at a local dealer in person, my decision was finally made.

There was one problem: our partners in paint, Axalta, was not the manufacturer of Dodge’s factory paint. But no worries, the pros at Axalta said they could match any color, it would just take several samples to get it perfect. Well, when sample number-one arrived, we had that a-ha moment. It wasn’t a perfect match. It was better, and thus was born the CBA color (Custom-By-Accident) moniker. Is it medium blue? Dark blue? Purple? Whatever it is, we only knew two things: it was gorgeous, and it actually shifts shades depending on the light hitting it. Pure awesomeness! The folks at Axalta crafted a one-of-a-kind color for a one-of-a-kind car. It’s easily the best-looking blue I have ever seen. So let’s get it on the car!

The Finer Details’ painter extraordinaire, Jay Webb, spent weeks on the car to get the final result that you see here. He employed a methodical, time-consuming process that he calls “top drawer,” and it yielded a show-car finish that pictures don’t do justice. Mosier says that this is the same painstaking process he and his team use when they are restoring a vehicle to compete for awards. They certainly know what they’re doing; over the years The Finer Details has racked up an impressive number of best-in-show awards at major events around the country. And we can see why!

Instead of going the traditional decal route for the butt stripe, we opted to paint one on the car. That meant more work but it would also give a seamless finish to the back of the car. The very first step in the whole painting process (once the car was masked properly) was to lay down several coats of our butt stripe color, a not-too-blingy silver pearl.
Instead of going the traditional decal route for the butt stripe, we opted to paint one on the car. That meant more work but it would also give a seamless finish to the back of the car. The very first step in the whole painting process (once the car was masked properly) was to lay down several coats of our butt stripe color, a not-too-blingy silver pearl.
The silver then had to completely dry before the butt stripe design could be taped off. The size of the stripe is factory, but we omitted the customary R/T symbol on either side. We felt that everyone with a customized Charger slaps some form of lettering in that particular area.
The silver then had to completely dry before the butt stripe design could be taped off. The size of the stripe is factory, but we omitted the customary R/T symbol on either side. We felt that everyone with a customized Charger slaps some form of lettering in that particular area.
The Finer Details painter, Jay Webb, mixes up the Axalta base in our custom-by-accident color. Let’s call it “Krispy Kreme Blueberry.” Jay is using Axalta’s Chromapremier Pro System, which is a system of primers, sealers, and clearcoats designed to help improve productivity without compromising the final appearance.
The Finer Details painter, Jay Webb, mixes up the Axalta base in our custom-by-accident color. Let’s call it “Krispy Kreme Blueberry.” Jay is using Axalta’s Chromapremier Pro System, which is a system of primers, sealers, and clearcoats designed to help improve productivity without compromising the final appearance.
Webb painted the car in multiple stages. First, he masked off the whole car from the firewall back, and shot the engine compartment.
Webb painted the car in multiple stages. First, he masked off the whole car from the firewall back, and shot the engine compartment.
With the engine compartment done, he masked it off and turned his attention to the bulk of the car including the rear quarters and roof.
With the engine compartment done, he masked it off and turned his attention to the bulk of the car including the rear quarters and roof.
Notice how he works from the top to the bottom. He’s using a smooth motion, always keeping the tip of the gun the same distance from the surface no matter the angle or spot he needs to hit. This is a learned skill and there is definitely an art to it.
Notice how he works from the top to the bottom. He’s using a smooth motion, always keeping the tip of the gun the same distance from the surface no matter the angle or spot he needs to hit. This is a learned skill and there is definitely an art to it.
With the initial coat laid down you can really get the idea of how masking off the butt stripe will work. Note that the trunk is not on the car. Later it will be bolted in place and aligned so that all three components of the butt stripe line up perfectly. Webb will use the same procedure on the trunk that he did on the quarters—spray silver, mask, then spray blue.
With the initial coat laid down you can really get the idea of how masking off the butt stripe will work. Note that the trunk is not on the car. Later it will be bolted in place and aligned so that all three components of the butt stripe line up perfectly. Webb will use the same procedure on the trunk that he did on the quarters—spray silver, mask, then spray blue.
Before the clear coat is applied, the car has a matte finish to it, yet you can really see at this point the quality of the Axalta paint and the skill of the application.
Before the clear coat is applied, the car has a matte finish to it, yet you can really see at this point the quality of the Axalta paint and the skill of the application.
With the clear coat applied, you can really tell that the color is something special and will pop once finished.
With the clear coat applied, you can really tell that the color is something special and will pop once finished.
Another subtle departure from stock is the fact that we painted the entire rear TV panel (as the NASCAR boys call it!) in body color.
Another subtle departure from stock is the fact that we painted the entire rear TV panel (as the NASCAR boys call it!) in body color.
With the body of the car painted, Webb turned his attention to the doors.
With the body of the car painted, Webb turned his attention to the doors.
This special fixture allows Webb to maximize the efficiency of painting two doors at one time.
This special fixture allows Webb to maximize the efficiency of painting two doors at one time.
A cloud of spray fills the paint booth as Webb applies the last coat of the Axalta Chromapremier.
A cloud of spray fills the paint booth as Webb applies the last coat of the Axalta Chromapremier.
Prior to the clear coat, you can see that the doors look identical to the earlier picture of the whole body.
Prior to the clear coat, you can see that the doors look identical to the earlier picture of the whole body.
The doors have begun to pop after the clearcoat was applied.
The doors have begun to pop after the clearcoat was applied.
Once the paint has dried and cured, Webb began the process of wet sanding. Typically, shops will perform three steps from here to bring the paint out, but Webb used a five-step process of sanding and buffing. He starts with 600-grit paper, shown here. He’ll then progress through 800, 1200, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3,000 to bring out a mirror-like finish.
Once the paint has dried and cured, Webb began the process of wet sanding. Typically, shops will perform three steps from here to bring the paint out, but Webb used a five-step process of sanding and buffing. He starts with 600-grit paper, shown here. He’ll then progress through 800, 1200, 1500, 2000, 2500, and 3,000 to bring out a mirror-like finish.
Webb spent three full days on each quarter panel just sanding and buffing in a process he calls “top drawer.” Most shops are not nearly that thorough.
Webb spent three full days on each quarter panel just sanding and buffing in a process he calls “top drawer.” Most shops are not nearly that thorough.
Scott Dowdy, who did all of the body work on the car, got into the action too, helping Webb by sanding and buffing the smoothed-out firewall.
Scott Dowdy, who did all of the body work on the car, got into the action too, helping Webb by sanding and buffing the smoothed-out firewall.
The fenders get the same treatment as the doors.
The fenders get the same treatment as the doors.
With the clearcoat on the fenders, they are ready for Webb’s “top drawer” sanding and buffing.
With the clearcoat on the fenders, they are ready for Webb’s “top drawer” sanding and buffing.
"Project
Project 50 is no trailer queen; we have plans for Hot Rod Power Tour, Mopar Nationals, and more. With that in mind, we opted to undercoat the car. The fenders are first and are shot off the car with Wurth SKS.
The car sits on a lift that Mosier’s guys use specifically for undercoating. Heavy-duty paper masks off and protects all of Webb’s hard work.
The car sits on a lift that Mosier’s guys use specifically for undercoating. Heavy-duty paper masks off and protects all of Webb’s hard work.
At The Finer Details, the application of the undercoat is as perfect and consistent as the paint, just not as shiny.
At The Finer Details, the application of the undercoat is as perfect and consistent as the paint, just not as shiny.

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With the car sanded, buffed, and fenders put back on, The Finer Details crew rolls it outside. Depending up the angle you look at the car, the color actually changes from light to dark. These photos were taken on a partly cloudy day as you can tell from the sky.
With the car sanded, buffed, and fenders put back on, The Finer Details crew rolls it outside. Depending up the angle you look at the car, the color actually changes from light to dark. These photos were taken on a partly cloudy day as you can tell from the sky.
Low and behold, when pushed back inside, the car changes to a purple color. Perhaps we should call it “Purpleberry?”
Low and behold, when pushed back inside, the car changes to a purple color. Perhaps we should call it “Purpleberry?”
To drop a late-model 6.4L Hemi crate motor into the Charger was a departure from tradition, but during paint, we decided to take it a step further. Webb had a little silver and blue leftover, so we had him paint the intake and coil covers in reverse to the factory, using our car’s color scheme.
To drop a late-model 6.4L Hemi crate motor into the Charger was a departure from tradition, but during paint, we decided to take it a step further. Webb had a little silver and blue leftover, so we had him paint the intake and coil covers in reverse to the factory, using our car’s color scheme.
Dropped into the car, the new topside of the motor works perfectly with the theme of the car. Note the reflection of the motor in the smoothed firewall.
Dropped into the car, the new topside of the motor works perfectly with the theme of the car. Note the reflection of the motor in the smoothed firewall.
We threw this little gem in here to visually explain why we bailed on having a logo or symbol in the butt stripe. Remember that we grafted scoops from a 1970 GTX onto the rear quarters of our Charger to create functional cooling ducts for the rear brakes. We felt that was enough “accent” for the rear of the car.
We threw this little gem in here to visually explain why we bailed on having a logo or symbol in the butt stripe. Remember that we grafted scoops from a 1970 GTX onto the rear quarters of our Charger to create functional cooling ducts for the rear brakes. We felt that was enough “accent” for the rear of the car.
This tight shot of the paint shows the pearlescent finish. If you want to duplicate this color on your Mopar, hit up the folks at Axalta for Chromapremier FH*737003 ECN01 Blue. The batch number is 1833575A.
This tight shot of the paint shows the pearlescent finish. If you want to duplicate this color on your Mopar, hit up the folks at Axalta for Chromapremier FH*737003 ECN01 Blue. The batch number is 1833575A.
The shop’s fluorescent lights can clearly be seen in the reflection of the paint.
The shop’s fluorescent lights can clearly be seen in the reflection of the paint.
"In
In what has to be the ultimate test of a car’s paint job, we bring you the Mopar Muscle reading test. Webb grabbed a copy of Mopar Muscle they had laying around and shot this mag selfie. You can actually read the magazine in the reflection—nicely done Jay!

Sources

The Finer Details(317) 745-2125http://www.thefinerdetails-1.com / Hotrod.com
Posted in Interesting Stuff

JBC 1947-53 Chevy Adjustable Transmission Crossmember

Say what you will about the old Stovebolts and straight axles, some Advance Design pickups simply weren’t destined for small-blocks and Mustang IIs. It’s really kind of refreshing to see a nicely done, subtly lowered 1947-1953 Chevy pickup still riding on parallel leafs and an I-beam with a hopped-up straight-six under the hood.

Whether you go the auto or manual route, there are plenty of options when it comes to mounting the transmission in the chassis. Jimenez Brothers Customs (JBC) just developed an all-new, adjustable transmission crossmember that not only is very straightforward to install, but allows for precise driveline placement while providing a super strong, worry-free mounting point for that modern gearbox.

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Now, in the process of incorporating the new drivetrain components, in most situations you end up losing the integral bellhousing side mounts. Seeing as the engine attaches to the frame at the very front, and the transmission now locates at the very rear, a weak point has been created where the bellhousing and block meet. JBC addressed that as well by developing a side-mount kit for the 216/235s. The brackets require welding, as that allows the installer to set the engine higher or lower than stock, if needed—but since the kit uses boxing plates for the frame, a proficient welder (both person and machine) is required for the job anyway. Furthermore, the tube center portion of the trans crossmember will need to be welded to the brackets as well.

We grabbed one of the first trans crossmembers JBC finished up to install in a bare 1947-1953 chassis to accommodate a 235/T-5 using JBC’s straight-six side-mount kit. Having the cab off allows the crossmember installation to be completely bolt-in; JBC also offers a bracket configuration designed specifically for “cab on” installations, which attaches to the side of the framerail rather than the upper/lower lips, but is still vertically adjustable.

JBC offers adjustable crossmember kits for the earlier (pre-1947) and later (1955-up) Chevys as well as Ford F-1/F-100s. Because of the universal nature, other makes and models will also apply depending on framerail height. Give JBC a call for more info.

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1 Jimenez Brothers Customs’ new adjustable transmission crossmember is available for a variety of makes/models of truck (and car) chassis: we’ll be installing their 1947-1953 Chevy version with the “cab off” brackets (brackets, shown, are available for installation with cab mounted).
05-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
2 And to compensate for the load stress in the absence of the stock bellhousing side-mounting crossmember, we’ll move the engine mounts back from below the timing cover to the side of the block with JBC’s 216/235 bracket kit (which includes frame boxing plates, not shown here).
06-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
3 The stock front crossmember serves a number of purposes: along with radiator core support base, it also mounts the inline-six engine. That portion will not only remain, it will also temporarily mount the 235 engine we’re using while we set up the new side brackets and trans crossmember.
07-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
4 The stock bellhousing mount crossmember, however, will be removed.

08-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG

09-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
5 First, the bulk of the crossmember was set free with a plasma cutter; the remaining portions riveted to the framerails were cut loose with an air chisel.
10-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
6 JBC’s side mounts for the 216/235, unlike the 1954-later factory type, allow a wide option of placement locations, from stock height (based off the front mount location, which we will use), or higher/lower depending on your drivetrain and chassis needs.
11-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
7 The 235, with its S-10 T5 attached via GM cast-iron bellhousing (with what some refer to as the “Muncie pattern”), was installed into the chassis using a new rubber front mount.
12-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
8 Once the driveline angle was initially set (based off the frame sitting at 0 degrees) with the engine mounted securely in the front cradle, the transmission tailshaft was supported on a jackstand.

13-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG

14-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
9 Despite having a semi-tight workspace with the engine between the ‘rails, the boxing plates were fit and tack-welded in.
15-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
10 If, for whatever reasons down the road, a Mustang II frontend is installed, the job will be that much easier having the boxing plates welded in (just the frame-side brackets would need to be trimmed off).

16-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG

17-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
11 With the block plates bolted tightly in place, the remaining portions of the bracket are assembled with the biscuit mount to determine how much needs to be trimmed off the frame-side bracket, as they’re supplied oversize.

18-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG

19-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
12 Once cut to size and fitted properly (parallel, not offset), each side is tack-welded together while still assembled.
20-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
13 After the transmission crossmember has been installed, the engine brackets will be removed and fully welded up.
21-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
14 The center portion of the crossmember is also supplied longer than needed for this application; before installing, it needs to be measured between the frame with the brackets set in place and then cut to size.
22-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
15 There are a few different ways in which the crossmember can be fit and installed; we chose to do so with the T5 left in place (with new tranny mount installed), where we set the driveline angle.
23-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
16 With the mounting hardware semi-snug, but not tight, the crossmember is squared up in the frame, and then the transmission tailshaft centered.
24-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
17 Once everything is set, the hardware is tightened up to place the frame brackets where they need to be so that the holes can be transferred and drilled into the framerails. We simply measured the bracket hole locations from the inside of the ‘rail and transferred that to the outside for drilling.
25-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
18 As mentioned in the story, having the cab mounted would dictate that instead of bolting on, the side brackets would need to be welded in place, as the floor prohibits access for drilling.
26-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
19 With our holes drilled and all supplied hardware installed, everything was tightened down securely.
27-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
20 The tube center still needs to be secured, however, as it’s free to rotate within the brackets no matter how tight they’re bolted down.
28-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
21 With the transmission centered (if there’s any side-to-side movement), the side brackets are then welded in place.
29-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
22 Save for finishing up the welds on the engine mount brackets, the old inline-six and its modern gearbox are set to go and power this old Chevy in its next shot at life on the road thanks to JBC.

Sources

Jimenez Brothers Customs2060 CHICAGO AVE STE B5Riverside, CA 92507(951) 784 – 4772http://www.jimenezbroscustoms.net/

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Those devout inliners aren’t all sticklers for originality when it comes to the remaining two-thirds of the driveline, however. The limitations of the torque tube when it comes to lowering the suspension is one thing that automatically leads to an open-drive swap—but equally a concern is the limitation of the factory gearing that really puts the early Chevy trucks at odds trying to keep pace with today’s freeway traffic. Fortunately, the 216/235 engine family affords the ability to drop the granny-geared top shifters for more modern transmissions: the popular T-5/Tremec conversion or the automatic route with a TH350 (or an overdrive with the properly set up engine). Combine that with a 10/12-bolt or 9-inch rearend, and now that old six can breathe a hell of a lot easier on the highway.

Whether you go the auto or manual route, there are plenty of options when it comes to mounting the transmission in the chassis. Jimenez Brothers Customs (JBC) just developed an all-new, adjustable transmission crossmember that not only is very straightforward to install, but allows for precise driveline placement while providing a super strong, worry-free mounting point for that modern gearbox.

01-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG

Now, in the process of incorporating the new drivetrain components, in most situations you end up losing the integral bellhousing side mounts. Seeing as the engine attaches to the frame at the very front, and the transmission now locates at the very rear, a weak point has been created where the bellhousing and block meet. JBC addressed that as well by developing a side-mount kit for the 216/235s. The brackets require welding, as that allows the installer to set the engine higher or lower than stock, if needed—but since the kit uses boxing plates for the frame, a proficient welder (both person and machine) is required for the job anyway. Furthermore, the tube center portion of the trans crossmember will need to be welded to the brackets as well.

We grabbed one of the first trans crossmembers JBC finished up to install in a bare 1947-1953 chassis to accommodate a 235/T-5 using JBC’s straight-six side-mount kit. Having the cab off allows the crossmember installation to be completely bolt-in; JBC also offers a bracket configuration designed specifically for “cab on” installations, which attaches to the side of the framerail rather than the upper/lower lips, but is still vertically adjustable.

JBC offers adjustable crossmember kits for the earlier (pre-1947) and later (1955-up) Chevys as well as Ford F-1/F-100s. Because of the universal nature, other makes and models will also apply depending on framerail height. Give JBC a call for more info.

03-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG

04-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
1 Jimenez Brothers Customs’ new adjustable transmission crossmember is available for a variety of makes/models of truck (and car) chassis: we’ll be installing their 1947-1953 Chevy version with the “cab off” brackets (brackets, shown, are available for installation with cab mounted).
05-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
2 And to compensate for the load stress in the absence of the stock bellhousing side-mounting crossmember, we’ll move the engine mounts back from below the timing cover to the side of the block with JBC’s 216/235 bracket kit (which includes frame boxing plates, not shown here).
06-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
3 The stock front crossmember serves a number of purposes: along with radiator core support base, it also mounts the inline-six engine. That portion will not only remain, it will also temporarily mount the 235 engine we’re using while we set up the new side brackets and trans crossmember.
07-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
4 The stock bellhousing mount crossmember, however, will be removed.

08-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG

09-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
5 First, the bulk of the crossmember was set free with a plasma cutter; the remaining portions riveted to the framerails were cut loose with an air chisel.
10-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
6 JBC’s side mounts for the 216/235, unlike the 1954-later factory type, allow a wide option of placement locations, from stock height (based off the front mount location, which we will use), or higher/lower depending on your drivetrain and chassis needs.
11-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
7 The 235, with its S-10 T5 attached via GM cast-iron bellhousing (with what some refer to as the “Muncie pattern”), was installed into the chassis using a new rubber front mount.
12-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
8 Once the driveline angle was initially set (based off the frame sitting at 0 degrees) with the engine mounted securely in the front cradle, the transmission tailshaft was supported on a jackstand.

13-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG

14-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
9 Despite having a semi-tight workspace with the engine between the ‘rails, the boxing plates were fit and tack-welded in.
15-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
10 If, for whatever reasons down the road, a Mustang II frontend is installed, the job will be that much easier having the boxing plates welded in (just the frame-side brackets would need to be trimmed off).

16-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG

17-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
11 With the block plates bolted tightly in place, the remaining portions of the bracket are assembled with the biscuit mount to determine how much needs to be trimmed off the frame-side bracket, as they’re supplied oversize.

18-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG

19-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
12 Once cut to size and fitted properly (parallel, not offset), each side is tack-welded together while still assembled.
20-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
13 After the transmission crossmember has been installed, the engine brackets will be removed and fully welded up.
21-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
14 The center portion of the crossmember is also supplied longer than needed for this application; before installing, it needs to be measured between the frame with the brackets set in place and then cut to size.
22-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
15 There are a few different ways in which the crossmember can be fit and installed; we chose to do so with the T5 left in place (with new tranny mount installed), where we set the driveline angle.
23-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
16 With the mounting hardware semi-snug, but not tight, the crossmember is squared up in the frame, and then the transmission tailshaft centered.
24-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
17 Once everything is set, the hardware is tightened up to place the frame brackets where they need to be so that the holes can be transferred and drilled into the framerails. We simply measured the bracket hole locations from the inside of the ‘rail and transferred that to the outside for drilling.
25-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
18 As mentioned in the story, having the cab mounted would dictate that instead of bolting on, the side brackets would need to be welded in place, as the floor prohibits access for drilling.
26-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
19 With our holes drilled and all supplied hardware installed, everything was tightened down securely.
27-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
20 The tube center still needs to be secured, however, as it’s free to rotate within the brackets no matter how tight they’re bolted down.
28-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
21 With the transmission centered (if there’s any side-to-side movement), the side brackets are then welded in place.
29-CLTP-161100-jimenez-bros-customs-adjustable-transmission-crossmember.JPG
22 Save for finishing up the welds on the engine mount brackets, the old inline-six and its modern gearbox are set to go and power this old Chevy in its next shot at life on the road thanks to JBC.

Sources

Jimenez Brothers Customs2060 CHICAGO AVE STE B5Riverside, CA 92507(951) 784 – 4772http://www.jimenezbroscustoms.net/ / Hotrod.com
Posted in Interesting Stuff

Freak Day Friday: Homemade Jeep

Everyone loves Jeeps. If you live somewhere in the world that doesn’t have them, or you can’t afford to own one, then crafty hot rodders will make their own, as we see here.

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Interesting Stuff

Goodguys Southwest Nationals 2016 Off To A Hot Start

The Southwest Nationals is the last event of the season for the Goodguys 2016 event calendar, but seasons don’t mean that much in Central Arizona. While street rodders in much of the rest of the country are getting ready to garage their vehicles for the winter and thinking about several months of off-season wrenching, enthusiasts at the Goodguys Southwest Nationals at WestWorld in Scottsdale are still cruising. With temps in the 70s, rainclouds nowhere to be seen, and sunlight in huge supply, mid November is car show weather around here.

goodguys-southwest-nationals-2016-30

The Goodsguys Southwest Nats had a full throttle start on Friday with thousands of beautiful ’72 and street rods, customs, classic trucks, street machines, and everything else we’ve come to expect from Goodguys events. Over the course of the weekend, we’ll be hanging around the various show car corrals (Homebuilt Heaven, You Gotta Drive ‘Em, Deuce Doings, ’40 Fords Forever, and Mighty Muscle being a few of our favorites), as well as the Goodguys Duel In The Desert Autocross, the Pro’s Pick competition (with judging by Dean Livermore from Hot Rods By Dean just a few miles away in Phoenix), and tons more. In between, we’ll be rushing back to our laptop to tell you all about it. Keep checking back to keep up with us. For now, here’s a quick sampler of some of Friday’s rides.

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Interesting Stuff