55th Annual Chicago World of Wheels

For the ultimate in automotive excitement, nothing rev’s up like a supercharged V-8 better than the O’Reilly Auto Parts Chicago World of Wheels, presented by South Oak Chrysler / Dodge / Jeep. Celebrating its 55th year, the event brings with it an amazing array of hot rods, customs, muscle cars, trucks and motorcycles.  For three days the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center — Rosemont is packed with endless rows of horsepower-laden dream machines awash in a kaleidoscope of color accented by dazzling chrome.

The event brings with it plenty of history which includes competition for the coveted Legend Cup presented by Clean Tools, awarded for excellence in both style and design captured with quality and craftsmanship for a first-time shown car at the show. The Top 20 outstanding entries are selected on Friday and narrowed down to the Select 6 on Saturday with the winner announced on Sunday at the awards presentation which includes the Legend Cup and grand prize of $5,000.00.

The event is also home to the Summit Racing Equipment ISCA Championship Finals. The Finals consist of five major categories: Rod, Custom, Truck, St Machine/Comp and Restored. This year thirty entries from these five categories will be competing for over $60,000 in prize money. The entries compete during the current show season to accumulate points to move on to the Finals (much like NHRA or NASCAR). At the Finals there are five Category Champions decided by the judging staff. A Grand Champion is then determined from the five Category Champions.  Want even more fun, the weekend features a number of specialty areas including Tin City for traditional hot rods and customs, Lowrider Nation, Summit Racing’s Chop-Shop featuring Gene Winfield, Cycle-Rama packed with hot motorcycles, Pedal Car Challenge presented by Summit Racing and the 10thAnnual Chicago Brushmasters charity auction.Special to any World of Wheels event there’s always plenty of entertainment throughout the weekend including an exclusive performance by Danny “The Count” Koker and his band Count’s 77; live Rockabilly in Tin City and a Pinup Girl Contest. You’ll also have a chance to meet up with a multitude of celebrity guests the show has become well-known for with this year featuring John Force, Brittany Force, Courtney Force, and Robert Hight all from John Force Racing presented by Chevrolet Performance. NHRA Funny Car Driver Tommy Johnson Jr, NASCAR Hall of Fame Legend Mark Martin, WWE Superstar Roman Reigns, Rick Harrison from History Channel’s hit Pawn Stars and Disney Channel’s Skai Jackson will also be on hand to meet multitudes of fans. This promises to be a fun-filled weekend, check it all out at Autorama.com

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Automotive History, Drivetrain, Events, Ford, General Motors, Industry News, Interesting Stuff, Mopar, New Parts, Parts Highlight, Restoration Tips

The Dodge Demon’s (Drive)line of Defense

We all know that adding horsepower is a great way to start breaking things. Everyone’s first thought is to fortify the motor, often leaving the drivetrain to figure it out at the strip. With great horsepower comes great responsibility, and a part of that is in ensuring the driveline can handle tire-rippling launches while keeping the factory warranty minty on your 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon.

To start, the driveshaft has 15 more torque capacity than the Hellcat, utilizing high-strength steel with 20-percent thicker wall thickness. The differential is also able to withstand 30-percent more torque than that same Hellcat, with a shot-peened, heat-treated A383 cast aluminum housing. Lastly, the 41-spline half-shafts are have been fortified by a good 20-percent, with larger diameter axle shafts and 8-ball CV joints keeping the family together.

But as we’ve mentioned before, hardware is only half the battle — The SRT Demon will have an industry-first wheel hop control, an advanced launch control system that looks specifically for the slipping-and-sticking shock loads that’ll rattle even those nitro lawn darts at the NHRA loose. Not only does this aid in starting line traction, but preventing wheel hop will save the driveline a harsh beating if the tires shake.

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Interesting Stuff, Mopar, New Parts, Parts Highlight, Racing News

Custom Tire and Wheel Fitment Advice for Your Street Rod

After obtaining our measurements on all four corners, we called the folks at Coker Tire Company to provide our measurements and see what works the best for this application. We let them know our maximum backspacing allowance, and our overall measurements and they helped us put together a tire and wheel package that really fits the bill. We wanted something traditional that would give the 1954 Buick a mild custom look, which will go perfectly with the car’s lowered stance. Our measurements showed us that we had lots of leeway on the front wheel backspacing, but we weren’t in the market for an extremely large front tire and wheel combination.

Out back, the spacious wheelwells allow for off-the-shelf wheel fitment and a tall tire. The most important measurement that we took at the rear of the car was for maximum backspacing allowance, which was 4.5 inches. The folks at Coker Tire provided an excellent combo for this car, and it consists of BFGoodrich Silvertown radial tires, sized at 215/70R15 up front and 255/70R15 out back. This provides a 2.25-inch rubber rake, while our 15×6 and 15×8 Smoothie wheels complement the big-and-little look. We were able to use off-the-shelf wheels with standard backspacing, but some applications may require custom backspacing for the perfect fitment. There are several factors that hinder tire and wheel fitment, but don’t let that keep you from dialing in your combination. Take a look at how we measured this 1954 Buick and use the same techniques on your street rod.

Before we get started measuring the 1954 Buick, let’s get a quick lesson in wheel sizing. This wheel is a 15x7 Smoothie wheel, and notice that the width measurement is taken where the tire’s bead seats to the rim. The overall width of the rim is more like 7.9375 inches.
Before we get started measuring the 1954 Buick, let’s get a quick lesson in wheel sizing. This wheel is a 15×7 Smoothie wheel, and notice that the width measurement is taken where the tire’s bead seats to the rim. The overall width of the rim is more like 7.9375 inches.
The overall rim width is important because the backspacing is measured from the outer edge of the wheel lip, not the bead seat area. This particular wheel features 4.25-inch backspacing, so you might do the easy math (7 minus 4.25) and come up with 2.75 inches of spacing on the front side of the wheel. When calculating the front side spacing, you must include the thickness of the rim’s edge, so this wheel would actually have 3.6875 inches on the front side. That’s nearly an inch difference, which is crucial.
The overall rim width is important because the backspacing is measured from the outer edge of the wheel lip, not the bead seat area. This particular wheel features 4.25-inch backspacing, so you might do the easy math (7 minus 4.25) and come up with 2.75 inches of spacing on the front side of the wheel. When calculating the front side spacing, you must include the thickness of the rim’s edge, so this wheel would actually have 3.6875 inches on the front side. That’s nearly an inch difference, which is crucial.
Another thing to consider is bolt pattern. If you’ve bought a street rod that is already finished, and you’re looking to update the tire and wheel combo, you’ll need to measure the front and rear. Sometimes, with the use of Mustang II front suspension and a GM rearend, the bolt patterns can be mismatched.
Another thing to consider is bolt pattern. If you’ve bought a street rod that is already finished, and you’re looking to update the tire and wheel combo, you’ll need to measure the front and rear. Sometimes, with the use of Mustang II front suspension and a GM rearend, the bolt patterns can be mismatched.
Our subject is a 1954 Buick, which features a Mustang II front suspension with GM-style disc brakes. Some cars have drastically different track widths when comparing drum brakes to disc brake conversions, so always take that into consideration. When measuring for tire and wheel fitment, always do so with the car at ride height. We place the jack beneath the lower control arm.
Our subject is a 1954 Buick, which features a Mustang II front suspension with GM-style disc brakes. Some cars have drastically different track widths when comparing drum brakes to disc brake conversions, so always take that into consideration. When measuring for tire and wheel fitment, always do so with the car at ride height. We place the jack beneath the lower control arm.
Even though companies like Coker Tire sell a device to measure tire and wheel fitment, we went with the old-school method of a straightedge and a tape measure. We took note of every measurement and our first one is from the wheel-mounting flange to the innermost point on the front fender. We came up with 5.5 inches.
Even though companies like Coker Tire sell a device to measure tire and wheel fitment, we went with the old-school method of a straightedge and a tape measure. We took note of every measurement and our first one is from the wheel-mounting flange to the innermost point on the front fender. We came up with 5.5 inches.
The Buick is very roomy in board of the mounting flange. We came up with 10.875 inches from the flange to the inner fender with the front wheels straight. We also measured the distance from the flange to the sway bar, and it is 6.5 inches. This tells us that we could run up to 5 inches of backspacing and still allow enough room for sidewall bulge.
The Buick is very roomy in board of the mounting flange. We came up with 10.875 inches from the flange to the inner fender with the front wheels straight. We also measured the distance from the flange to the sway bar, and it is 6.5 inches. This tells us that we could run up to 5 inches of backspacing and still allow enough room for sidewall bulge.
Cranking the wheels to the right, we try a few different scenarios, based on estimated tire height. To do this, you can take your desired tire height (ours is 27 inches), and then cut it in half. We use the straightedge to measure 13.5 inches from the centerline to the end of our imaginary tire. Then, we place the straightedge on the trailing edge of the flange and measure to the front fender. We’re showing 3.5 inches at full lock.
Cranking the wheels to the right, we try a few different scenarios, based on estimated tire height. To do this, you can take your desired tire height (ours is 27 inches), and then cut it in half. We use the straightedge to measure 13.5 inches from the centerline to the end of our imaginary tire. Then, we place the straightedge on the trailing edge of the flange and measure to the front fender. We’re showing 3.5 inches at full lock.
Now, we can turn the wheels to the left and take a similar measurement. This time, we are placing the straightedge on the leading edge of the mounting flange. Caster adjustments affect how far the tire tips in or tips out in harsh cornering, so be sure to have your suspension aligned before measurements are taken. We’re showing 2.75 inches from the flange to the fender lip.
Now, we can turn the wheels to the left and take a similar measurement. This time, we are placing the straightedge on the leading edge of the mounting flange. Caster adjustments affect how far the tire tips in or tips out in harsh cornering, so be sure to have your suspension aligned before measurements are taken. We’re showing 2.75 inches from the flange to the fender lip.
Out back, the Buick features a late-model 10-bolt GM rearend, which is narrower than the stock rearend housing. This gives us a lot of latitude for tire and wheel fitment, as these cars have spacious wheelwells. Always put a tape measure on the overall wheel opening, just to get an idea of your ideal tire diameter. Our desired size is 29 inches.
Out back, the Buick features a late-model 10-bolt GM rearend, which is narrower than the stock rearend housing. This gives us a lot of latitude for tire and wheel fitment, as these cars have spacious wheelwells. Always put a tape measure on the overall wheel opening, just to get an idea of your ideal tire diameter. Our desired size is 29 inches.
Measuring the rear is pretty straightforward. We start by measuring from the flange to the lip on the quarter-panel. We like to allow 0.5-inch for flex, and our measurement shows 5.5 inches of room from flange to lip.
Measuring the rear is pretty straightforward. We start by measuring from the flange to the lip on the quarter-panel. We like to allow 0.5-inch for flex, and our measurement shows 5.5 inches of room from flange to lip.
From the flange to the framerail, we measure 6.625 inches, which gives us a lot of wiggle room. Ideally, you want to allow 1 inch on each side of the rim for sidewall bulge, especially if you are using moderately sized wheels and 70-series or taller tires. Low-profile tires on large diameter do not require so much sidewall allowance.
From the flange to the framerail, we measure 6.625 inches, which gives us a lot of wiggle room. Ideally, you want to allow 1 inch on each side of the rim for sidewall bulge, especially if you are using moderately sized wheels and 70-series or taller tires. Low-profile tires on large diameter do not require so much sidewall allowance.
It’s always important to look for contact areas that stick out further than obvious interference points, such as the framerail. On this particular car, the shock mount sticks out almost an inch, reducing our space to 5.875 inches. Given our measurements, a comfortable fit will be a 15x8 wheel with up to 4.5 inches of backspacing.
It’s always important to look for contact areas that stick out further than obvious interference points, such as the framerail. On this particular car, the shock mount sticks out almost an inch, reducing our space to 5.875 inches. Given our measurements, a comfortable fit will be a 15×8 wheel with up to 4.5 inches of backspacing.
This is what it looks like when you misjudge tire and wheel fitment by about 0.125 inch. This tire may have cleared when the car was sitting in the garage, but harsh corning pushed it into the nearest interference point. Interference with a bracket or bolt could potentially wear on the sidewall enough to create a real problem.
This is what it looks like when you misjudge tire and wheel fitment by about 0.125 inch. This tire may have cleared when the car was sitting in the garage, but harsh corning pushed it into the nearest interference point. Interference with a bracket or bolt could potentially wear on the sidewall enough to create a real problem.
Finally, we take an overall measurement of the wheel tub, so that you can calculate the desired tire’s section width. For our example, we’re using a pair of BFGoodrich 255/70R15 whitewall radials from Coker Tire. These tires feature a section width of 10.20 inches, which should fit nicely in the roomy wheelwell.
Finally, we take an overall measurement of the wheel tub, so that you can calculate the desired tire’s section width. For our example, we’re using a pair of BFGoodrich 255/70R15 whitewall radials from Coker Tire. These tires feature a section width of 10.20 inches, which should fit nicely in the roomy wheelwell.
Up front, we’re running BFGoodrich 215/70R15 wide whites, mounted to 15x6 Smoothie wheels with 3.625 inches of backspacing. Out back, we’re rolling on BFGoodrich 255/70R15s, mounted to 15x8 Smoothie wheels with 4 inches of backspacing. The tires, wheels, caps, and lug nuts came as a complete package from Coker Tire.
Up front, we’re running BFGoodrich 215/70R15 wide whites, mounted to 15×6 Smoothie wheels with 3.625 inches of backspacing. Out back, we’re rolling on BFGoodrich 255/70R15s, mounted to 15×8 Smoothie wheels with 4 inches of backspacing. The tires, wheels, caps, and lug nuts came as a complete package from Coker Tire.
Project Shop Truck looks fine with the always-popular five-spoke wheel with raised white letter or blackwall rubber. But in keeping with the ’60s look it needs something different to really pull it off.
Utilizing Coker steelies and thin-stripe whitewalls with spider caps and bias-appearing but Coker radials, Project Shop Truck maintains its old-time look but has modern performance for negotiating speeds.

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Automotive History, Ford, General Motors, Interesting Stuff, Mopar, New Parts, Parts Highlight, Truck

Track-Focused Camaro ZL1 1LE Debuts

As if the 650hp Camaro ZL1 wasn’t enough, Chevrolet just upped the ante with a gonzo track version that they debuted at Daytona International Speedway. Like the 1LE package that’s available for 6th-generation V6 and V8 Camaros, the 2018 ZL1 1LE is focused on handling and lower lap times and is available only with a 6-speed manual. Unlike the naturally-aspirated 1LEs, the ZL1 is powered by the supercharged 6.2L LT4 that’s shared with the Z06 Corvette and carries over a bit of 5th-gen Z/28 by using Multimatic Dynamic Suspension Spool Valve (DSSV) shock absorbers front and rear. The front suspension features an adjustable ride height and camber plates for track-day tuning, while the rear anti-sway bar has three settings to dial in to the track and quickly return to street duty.

The 2018 ZL1 1LE uses the widest tire package offered on a Camaro, with 305/30ZR19 Goodyear Eagle F1 Supercar 3R tires up front, matching the size used on all four corners of the fifth-generation Z/28. In the rear, 325/30ZR19s are tucked into the fenderwells, just shy of the 335mm-wide tires used on the Z06. The tires are mounted to unique, forged aluminum wheels and deliver a maximum lateral grip of 1.10g. To maintain cornering power at speed, new front dive planes and a carbon fiber rear wing provide additional downforce.

2018 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 1LE

Despite the wheels and tires giving the ZL1 1LE 10-percent larger footprint, they’re each about 1.5 pounds lighter per corner in part because the wheels are one inch shorter in diameter compared to the ZL1. Weight savings on the ZL1 1LE continue through the use of a non-folding rear seat, thinner rear window glass, and the move to DSSV shocks. The total is approximately 60 pounds compared to a standard ZL1.

When this car was seen in camouflage, many concluded that it would be the next Z/28. The name fits the track-oriented nature of the car and it does have a nice ring to it, while ZL1 1LE doesn’t quite roll off the tongue, but the lack of a high-revving naturally aspirated V8 would have no doubt caused Z/28 purists to flock to their keyboards and voice their displeasure. With the LS7 gone and nothing in the current powertrain stable to fill its shoes, we’d been hoping that the rumored LT5 would be the go-to for the next super Camaro. In the standard ZL1 trim, the LT4 does a fantastic job and even sounds the part.

Chevy Unveils 2018 Camaro ZL1 1LE at Daytona

Aside from the name, the big surprise about the ZL1 1LE has to be the transmission. With the gap in performance between automatics and their human-shifted counterparts growing, we applaud Chevrolet for offering the manual, but are surprised by the lack of availability of the ZL1’s fantastically integrated 10-speed automatic transmission.

Source: hotrod.com
Posted in Interesting Stuff

New Warehouse Aerial Video!

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Showtime Speedway Saved

Check out the gallery from when we paid a visit to Showtime Speedway in July!

Clearwater, FL- Chalk up a win for short track racing in a battle against development.  On Friday the Tampa Bay Times reported that a connecting road originally planned to go through Showtime Speedway will now bypass it.

State Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater, and the speedway’s owner, Bob Yoho, made an announcement yesterday that a compromise was made to reconfigure the path.

The bypass will keep the ¼-mile asphalt track with a figure 8 and dragstrip in operation well into the future.

It was thought the track was living on borrowed time until the Florida Department of Transportation would build a road connecting Interstate 275 to the Bayside Bridge.  Yoho secured a five-year lease from the FDOT in 2012 to operate the track until the road was built.  He will continue paying approximately $15,000 per month in a lease renewal for five more years.  However, Yoho plans to stay in operation longer than that.

The reconfigured road now will run on the west side of the drag strip.  Showtime will lose some parking, but are not sure how much.

For more information on Showtime Speedway visit showtimespeedway.us

Original Article from Tampa Bay Times http://www.beaches.tampabay.com/news/localgovernment/sen-jack-latvala-planned-connector-road-to-bypass-showtime-speedway/2314473

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Interesting Stuff

2017 Detroit Autorama 1931 Ford Coupe Wins Editor’s Choice as Extreme Rod

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Downstairs of Cobo Hall, where the Detroit Autorama got its start, is now the home of the Autorama Extreme where everything from the traditional build style through rat rods and now to more evolved hot rods.

Each year I have the opportunity to hand out an award that’s titled the Editor’s Choice pick for the car of my choice. What was once a rare occurrence has now become a tradition? Each year it appears a Model A whether it be a coupe or roadster takes home the honors. This year was no different.

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David Weinberg of Royal Oak, Michigan brought out his little Model A highboy coupe fitted to a ’32 frame and Deuce grille shell with E&J headlights that was carefully fabricated by Bill Jagenow of Brothers Custom Automotive. Power comes by way of a 276 Merc Flathead topped with a pair pf Stromberg 97’s all linked to a three-speed moving the power back to a Speedway Engineering quick-change. Inside a very cool looking set of Classic Instrument gauges to set off the Model A dash.

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Front rubber comes by way of Firestone measuring 5.00 x 16 while the rubber in back the Firestone Deluxe Champions measure out at 7.50 x 16 mounted to chrome steelies with Merc caps.

Congratulations to both owner David Weinberg and builder Bill Jagenow for coming up with a great little highboy Model A coupe.

 

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Interesting Stuff