Parts to Power: Why Have Higher Octanes?

Written by Matthew McMurray on December 16th, 2016

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Source: Pinterest

Did you read the title? If you did, and your here, your interested in one of the wonders that 80% of mankind has little or no information about. The power of octane is actually quite significant. Its abilities are surprising to even those who know and love their sweet, precious com-busting carbon creators. The complexity is rather more of a science than anything. Before further detail is given, lets give some honorable and very unintelligent guesses that the community has to offer.

For example, the photo above shows a man pouring flames out the exhaust of his 1959 Cadillac, which he likes to refer to as the “Flame Thrower”. The meaning behind the name? Well that’s common sense. What isn’t common sense, however, is the fact that this car is aloud to blow fire out the tailpipes on a public street. The amazement of the crowd was actually quite hysterical. Seriously? People think that he must be some kind of god because he’s making warmth and a cool oxygen effect occur at one of the darkest times during the day. His secret lies between a lighter and low octane gasoline.

Since the gasoline has such low octane, it ignites and com-busts without any extremely weird and complex sequence. Something commonly thought among those who drive their cars with camber and ricer wide bodies (better known as the guys who think stickers increase horsepower) think that higher octane means more speed and acceleration in the top end. Although this statement is directed more towards the confused youngsters, they’re not the only ones that I’ve heard say odd stuff such as this.

Image result for gas sign w/ octane

Source: Burkett Oil Company, Inc.

Octane grade based around the quality of fuel that your vehicle desires. Most appliances, such as the Honda Odyssey or the Nissan Quest, use 87 octane graded fuel as a high recommendation. This is because anything higher then 87 is not necessary for this motor to run efficiently. This leads to the conclusion that buying anything higher then 87 for a minivan is usually not needed.

This concept of higher octane is directed towards high performance cars for the wrong reason. Most predict that the purpose of such a number has to do with that of the power and compression strokes that the 4 stroke cycle inhabits. In addition to this, people think that they’re increasing performance via horsepower or torque, which isn’t necessarily true. This product, gasoline, actually has a potency level that is specific to how much it has been diluted using additives and other substances. In other words, the lower the octane, the less natural it is. Therefore, when a motor requires high potency, it cannot receive a low octane fuel. Make sense? Good. Your gonna want to know this for what’s next.

Image result for detonation on piston

Source: DOOTalk

Detonation. It only has to happen a few times and that’s the end of your motor. This is one of the few side effects that results after the process of detonation. However, detonation can occur be activated from multiple different sources, including improper octane level, preignition, or maybe even dirty fuel. Whatever your source of danger is, the result is indicated through actions such as clanking, popping, shutting off, and even dieseling over after ignition disengagement.

How to prevent it: make sure that you have proper timing, the proper octane gasoline in your fuel lines, and even replace the fuel in your system now and then to prevent the fuel from becoming diluted and depreciated over time.

Source: partstopower.com

 

Posted in Interesting Stuff

Parts To Power: A Dance With the Demon

Written by Matthew McMurray on April 12, 2017

Image result for dodge demon

Source: hotrod.com

Forget about Devil’s Advocate. They’ve turned “What ifs” into realities. 840 Horsepower from Hell sits between 4 tires and the heart of American Muscle. What come next melts the minds of anyone who thought at all that Dodge was done. Including Satan himself.

The 2018 Dodge Demon digs deeper into the core of classics, yanking every old, yet appreciated fashion of its time. The Hellcat was a new concept, but wasn’t enough. At least in the eyes of Dodge.

It took 840 horsepower, custom Nitto tracks and a hellish amount of propaganda to please those who thought 707 horsepower was not enough to quench their thriving gear head dreams. Dodge presents: The 2018 Dodge Demon.

Capture

Source: hotrod.com

When the Dodge SRT Hellcat was released in 2016, Dodge was showered with an awed audience and critical comments. While it was one of Dodge’s dangerous yet drivable concepts, it still weighed over 4,100 pounds. So, you can imagine that anyone who disliked the car gave it ridiculous names such as “Fat Cat” & “Hell Kitty”. Maybe it was the envy of a heavy beast speeding from a dead stop to high speeds to then crush the quarter mile in less then 11 seconds.

It only took a few passes for people to find alternatives to increase the overall performance of their Hellcats. Accessories such as: smaller tires, cool air systems and even removal of unnecessary weight.

With time and popularity, The Dodge SRT Hellcat became one of the proud sons of Mopar. It came down in recent history as one of the fastest production cars in the 1/4 mile. However cool the Hellcat looked in 2015, everything about the first wave of Horsepower from Hell got burned and thrown away when Dodge played it’s second set of cards.

2018-dodge-demon

Source: hotrod.com

For those who are confused as to what Dodge was going for exactly when they developed this Chevrolet Crusher/ Ford Flipper, they went beyond anything considered to be competition. They focused on worldwide records, instead of just  average nationwide trophies.

The Dodge SRT Dodge Demon now holds the official Guinness World Records for: World’s fastest production car, First production car to do wheelies, World’s fastest 0-60 car, and Highest horsepower of any production car on the road.

A man of science would say it has to do with the fact the car has 840 HP, 730 FT LB of Torque and weighs only around 3400 lbs. So yeah, it’s gonna do wheelies. Meanwhile, a man of faith would find himself praying to the dear hell below him, for allowing “A BEAST UNLIKE ANY KNOWN TO MAN” (#ifyouknowyouknow) to reach Earth’s surface.

Whichever perspective you have, your right. The car that lies before you has the ability to make anyone lose themselves.

Source: hotrod.com

Okay, so they may have over done the logo. So? It just proves that Dodge has a heart for their product, so they’re not just gonna leave it logo-less. That’s like having a girlfriend, but not even bothering to touch her or even acknowledge her.

Although many may complain that Dodge re-used the Hellcat logo to make their careening beast, people could practically dismantle a Hellcat and use the parts on one of the 2015 Dodge Challenger SXT’s and you’d still believe that it was stock. So with a few extra pieces of plastic, they’ve marked their territory. Besides, its not like the Hellcat X where they just put an X next to the logo. They definitely converted the logo, no matter how much you hate it or love it.

The Dodge Demon’s jaw dropping features can rarely be seen, unless your really on the look-out. Pay attention, the car runs 9.60s @ 140 in the 1/4 mile for a reason. Watch closely…

2018-Dodge-Challenger-SRT-Demon-engine-1.jpg

Here’s a familiar face! At least from the outside, this motor looks similar to that of the Dodge SRT Hellcat 6.2L V8 with the well known whining supercharger that takes the show when the hood is propped out of the way. Without any information, you’d think the motor is the same, just with a different emblem on the supercharger.

Although it may look similar, the internals could prove it to be very different. Dodge explained to the community during the Twitter Live Release, that everything about the motor is different, minus the aluminum cylinders that were used on the Hellcat.

The cars specifications include 808 horsepower (840 HP @ 6300 RPM on the dyno) and has an unknown weight, but is presumed to be under 3500 lbs. Most importnantly, to those who want to save money on a race production vehicle, its likely that the car will cost less than $100,000.

Image result for dodge demon burnout 2017

Source: hotrod.com

In conclusion, this car is one of the most bad ass tire cookers that tears that is soon to thrash the US streets in 2017. It’s going to be a popular topic for awhile, whether it makes no sense to you, or is everything you’ve ever dreamed of.

Only one question is left over.

What’s next?

Source: partstopower.com

Posted in Interesting Stuff

Freak Show Friday: Bonking a ‘Burban Back to Your ‘Burban

We always admire crafty builders that modify their cars and trucks to suit their needs and budgets. Such is the case here with the Chevy Suburban ‘Burban. When you need to carry 4×12-foot plywood you can’t have it hanging out the back of your ‘Burb, nor can you lash it onto the top. But here’s a handy tip when faced with such a dilemma; just add on another truck—and try to at least match the make of vehicle as this crafty fabricator has done. But don’t plan on the existing chassis to be able to carry that extra weight. You need to spread the load, so besides bonking a ‘burban back onto your sub, why not add the frame and rear axle for handling and weight transfer nirvana. What would have made this a perfect match would have been if he could have just found a red back to match the front. Oh, well, it’s still a striking marriage of two ‘burbs into one functional and fancy-free workhorse.

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Interesting Stuff

A Tale of Two Cars

If you were one of the thousands of people who watched Gear Vendor’s HOT ROD Drag Week, powered by Dodge, in 2015 or 2016, you may remember the slowest car of the entire event: a 1969 Rambler American. The mid-22-second car ran the week without issue and provided its owner and driver, Daniel Ashlock, with good memories and (funnily enough) a trophy for fastest AMC.

The Rambler at a check point in 2015.
The Rambler at a check point in 2015.

So why the Rambler? David Freiburger joked about how if Daniel just broke the beam and backed out of the box he would have finished with a 2 second faster average over the week — so why take the slowest car of Drag Week, twice?

In the staging lanes.In the staging lanes.

Well the story starts in 2006 when Daniel, who reigns from Northeast Oklahoma, actually bought his 1986 Buick Grand National. That car started off with a basic rebuild. Using JE pistons, ARP fasteners, ported iron heads, small roller cam, front mount intercooler and a 62/62 turbo the car ran low 11s; and after some tuning and massaging, the car was pushed into the 10.70’s on the same combination.

Daniel actually brought the GN to Drag Week in 2012, 2013 and 2014. He was always learning the car and pushing it to find every ounce of speed he could, and for 2014 he had upgraded to a forged bottom end, Holley Dominator ECU, and an even bigger 66/68 turbo from Work Turbochargers, which got the car into the 10.30’s — but all that work came at a price.

He’d thrashed hard those years and was worn out, both physically and emotionally. This brings us to 2015, when Daniel purposely left the Grand National at home. Having owned the Rambler since 2002 he pulled it from the weeds and got it ready to compete at Drag Week.

Swapping the tires from track to street on Daniels 86 Grand NationalSwapping the tires from track to street on Daniels 86 Grand National

Addressing the car was fairly simple since the Rambler is essentially stock and only required new fluids and fresh tires and Daniel was off to the races. This was a refreshing year for Daniel, as not only did he finish without the thrash of the previous year, but he also went solo without a co-driver.

For 2016 Daniel wanted to bring the GN back, but after trying to get it together he threw in the towel and decided to once again bring the Rambler, which was pretty much exactly as it was the year prior for fun Daniel entered it into the Ultimate Iron category. The trusty Rambler managed to get Daniel the Fastest AMC award this year, which doesn’t say much for you AMC guys.

004-daniel-ashlock

Over the years Daniel has some great memories. In 2012 he won the fastest Buick and fastest six-cylinder awards, which was an incredible accomplishment to pull off on his first year. Getting to know fellow racers, the camaraderie that exists, and the feeling you get from actually being on the road is irreplaceable and no amount of coverage able to capture the feeling of actually being there.

Bringing the slowest car of Drag Week two years in a row shows how incredible the event really is. Not wanting to miss out, Daniel left his race car and packed up the Rambler just to be there. In the future, he wants to run nine second ETs with the GN when it returns next. Daniel wants to thank his parents, his very understanding wife, and last but not least, his friend Alan Reinken who not only helps wrench and tune the car, but also acts as co-pilot when Dan isn’t solo.

The Grand National ready to leave for Drag Week 2014.
The Grand National ready to leave for Drag Week 2014.
Posted in Interesting Stuff

HOT ROD Power Tour Says Hello to Champaign, IL and Davenport, IA

HOT ROD Power Tour Says Hello to Champaign, IL and Davenport, IA


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Posted in General Motors, Interesting Stuff, Mopar, Racing News

A second chance for a vintage Chevy

Anyone who works on old trucks has to be an understanding sort. After all, you’re dealing with something that has been used, often abused, and most likely neglected, so it takes TLC to bring many of them back to life but the results are always worth the effort.

In most cases there are three basic areas that need to be addressed on classic trucks—rusty sheetmetal, dealing with the fact that these were simple, unsophisticated vehicles that can benefit from modern technology, and the fact that many of the moving parts are worn out. As a case study we offer Buck Lyons’ 1949 Chevrolet.

Considering the age of Lyons’ truck, it was in reasonably good condition. That’s not to say repairs weren’t needed—not long ago in the pages of Classic Trucks we documented the installation of a new toeboard, firewall, and cowl repair panel from Classic Parts of America. Now we were on to the second phase of the cab’s rehab, so we made another call to Classic Parts of America for POR-15, Dynamat, and Dynaliner, along with replacement parts for the doors.

As the damaged sheetmetal had been replaced earlier, the remainder of the cab needed to be protected from any future corrosion. That required removing surface contamination with a wire brush and then chemically treating the bare metal with POR-15 metal prep; it etches the metal to provide the best adhesion for POR-15 Rust Preventive Coating and also leaves a zinc phosphate coating to aid chemical bonding of paint and steel.

Once the interior metal surfaces were pronounced rust-free we turned our attention to one of the shortcomings of every early truck: the lack of insulation and sound deadening. On a hot day you can boil an egg inside the cabs of most old trucks and when it’s cold you need an ice scraper for the inside of the glass. Couple that with a sound level that is similar to riding in a 55-gallon drum full of rocks and the need for insulation is clear.

Reducing noise inside the cab and keeping the temperature in check is best done with two products. To reduce road noise and vibration we used Dynamat, a thin, supersticky butyl rubber bonded to an aluminum alloy skin. With the interior surfaces covered Dynamat makes truck cabs feel solid—the doors close with a solid “thunk” rather than sounding like dropping loose change into a tin can.

The second component in the quest for a quiet cab was a layer of Dynaliner. A lightweight thermal insulator, it’s made from soft, self-adhesive, closed-cell rubber. With tiny cells packed close together it has the ability to reduce heat as well as resist oil and water. Since it will not hold water, it will not promote rust or mildew like most under carpet padding and thermal insulators. Combined with Dynamat, Dynaliner nearly doubles the total thermal resistance ability, which is what we were after.

After dealing with rust and adding installation the last step in our cab’s rehab was replacing the worn door hardware. Considering how many times the doors have been opened and closed over the years it’s somewhat surprising they’re still attached to the truck. To make everything old new again we ordered new door hinges, latches, and related hardware, window regulators, and a box full of other parts to be used later from Classic Parts of America. New hinges and latches will not only make the doors operate smoothly, they will correct body line alignment issues—and rolling up the windows without having to grab the glass and pull is just one advantage of new regulators.

With the necessary replacement parts and supplies from Classic Parts of America, and the efforts of Christian Arriero in the TEN Tech Center, Lyons’ truck cab is well on its way to completing rehab. Next time around we’ll give it a few more treatments and the Chevy will be ready to face the world.


Buck Lyons’ 1949 Chevy cab had some rusty sheetmetal replaced with panels from Classic Parts of America. The next task was to protect the rest of it from the elements.
Buck Lyons’ 1949 Chevy cab had some rusty sheetmetal replaced with panels from Classic Parts of America. The next task was to protect the rest of it from the elements.
Christian Arriero began the cab rehab process by wire brushing the interior to remove any loose rust, dirt, or other contaminants.
Christian Arriero began the cab rehab process by wire brushing the interior to remove any loose rust, dirt, or other contaminants.
The next step was to clean and etch all the surfaces to be painted with POR-15 Metal Prep.
The next step was to clean and etch all the surfaces to be painted with POR-15 Metal Prep.
With the sheetmetal prepped it was coated with POR-15 Rust Preventative.
With the sheetmetal prepped it was coated with POR-15 Rust Preventative.
POR-15 can be brushed or sprayed with both methods using gloves and an organic vapor particulate respirator should be worn.
POR-15 can be brushed or sprayed with both methods using gloves and an organic vapor particulate respirator should be worn.
Even when brushed on POR-15 flows out, providing a smooth, gloss black finish.
Even when brushed on POR-15 flows out, providing a smooth, gloss black finish.
Dynamat Xtreme is an effective sound control material available that is easy to cut and install. The butyl rubber and heavy aluminum will stretch and contour to irregular surfaces without tearing.
Dynamat Xtreme is an effective sound control material available that is easy to cut and install. The butyl rubber and heavy aluminum will stretch and contour to irregular surfaces without tearing.
For additional insulation we also used Dynaliner. It’s available in 1/8-, 1/4-, and 1/2-inch thicknesses.
For additional insulation we also used Dynaliner. It’s available in 1/8-, 1/4-, and 1/2-inch thicknesses.
To insulate the cab floor from exhaust and running gear heat, as well as road noise, a combination of Dynamat and Dynaliner was used.
To insulate the cab floor from exhaust and running gear heat, as well as road noise, a combination of Dynamat and Dynaliner was used.
The cab roof was also treated with POR-15—it’s not a bad idea to wear a hat when working overhead. It takes a while to get this paint out of your hair.
The cab roof was also treated with POR-15—it’s not a bad idea to wear a hat when working overhead. It takes a while to get this paint out of your hair.
Using Dynamat in the roof will absorb much of the drumming sounds and vibration early trucks are known for. Notice the entire surface does not have to be covered to be effective.
Using Dynamat in the roof will absorb much of the drumming sounds and vibration early trucks are known for. Notice the entire surface does not have to be covered to be effective.
A layer of Dynaliner in the roof will help to eliminate heat gain from the sun beating down on the top.
A layer of Dynaliner in the roof will help to eliminate heat gain from the sun beating down on the top.
The last bit of Dynamat was applied inside the doors; it makes them sound solid when closing and keeps the sheetmetal from vibrating with door-mounted speakers.
The last bit of Dynamat was applied inside the doors; it makes them sound solid when closing and keeps the sheetmetal from vibrating with door-mounted speakers.
Worn-out latches not only allow the outside door handles to sag, they can be a safety hazard as well. Classic Parts of America supplied new replacement latches.
Worn-out latches not only allow the outside door handles to sag, they can be a safety hazard as well. Classic Parts of America supplied new replacement latches.
Before the new latches were installed the moving parts were given a light coat of lubricant.
Before the new latches were installed the moving parts were given a light coat of lubricant.
OEM-style replacement screws were used to secure the new latches to the doors.
OEM-style replacement screws were used to secure the new latches to the doors.
Both wobbly inside door latch relay mechanisms were swapped for new parts from Classic Parts of America.
Both wobbly inside door latch relay mechanisms were swapped for new parts from Classic Parts of America.
The relay linkage from the handles attaches to the latch via a slotted hole. Once it’s in the proper position the link can’t come off.
The relay linkage from the handles attaches to the latch via a slotted hole. Once it’s in the proper position the link can’t come off.
With the all the actuating hardware in place the doors operate like new, and several rattles are usually eliminated.
With the all the actuating hardware in place the doors operate like new, and several rattles are usually eliminated.
For around $40 each, new door latches are an excellent investment in safety; Chevrolet used this style rotary latch from 1947-1951.
For around $40 each, new door latches are an excellent investment in safety; Chevrolet used this style rotary latch from 1947-1951.
Along with the new latches we opted to install new strikers. As with the latches, left and right strikers differ.
Along with the new latches we opted to install new strikers. As with the latches, left and right strikers differ.
After almost 70 years it was no surprise the window regulators were worn out. There was a pair of replacements in the big box from Classic Parts of America.
After almost 70 years it was no surprise the window regulators were worn out. There was a pair of replacements in the big box from Classic Parts of America.
To keep a refurbished cab secure we installed new door locks. A kit is available that includes one door lock, one ignition tumbler, and one glovebox lock (all locks are keyed alike).
To keep a refurbished cab secure we installed new door locks. A kit is available that includes one door lock, one ignition tumbler, and one glovebox lock (all locks are keyed alike).
The new door handles are held on with hidden screws. (A quick way to tell a 1949-1951 from a 1952 to first series 1955 is by the door handles—the later models have push buttons.)
The new door handles are held on with hidden screws. (A quick way to tell a 1949-1951 from a 1952 to first series 1955 is by the door handles—the later models have push buttons.)
Last but not least were new door hinges. Very often in need of replacement, doors are impossible to align correctly nor will they be operated correctly on worn-out hinges.
Last but not least were new door hinges. Very often in need of replacement, doors are impossible to align correctly nor will they be operated correctly on worn-out hinges.

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Automotive History, General Motors, Interesting Stuff

Chevrolet Drag Tunes the Camaro SS

Chevrolet Performance Tweaks an SS to Run 10s

One of the first things we did when we got behind the wheel of a 2016 Camaro SS was hit the dragstrip. The new 8L90 automatic transmission proved to be quicker than the manual, even with a talented driver at the wheel. Careful launch techniques and judicious application of the throttle netted us ¼-mile ETs in the low 12s, very respectable for a naturally aspirated V8 pony car. Of course the factory Camaro SS was just a starting point, there’s always a little room for improvement. The Camaro SS Drag Race Development Program was created within Chevrolet Performance to build a drag race capable Camaro that can handle hard launches with added horsepower and validate parts that would shave the most time from 60-foot times and elapsed times. The swirl-camouflaged test car, first shown at SEMA 2016, borrowed the propshaft, and half-shafts from the Gen 6 ZL1 and had more than 100 launches under its belt. The 250mm (9.8-inch) ring gear used in the differential of the fifth-generation Camaro ZL1 helped earn it the nickname “gravedigger” because it just couldn’t be destroyed. As equipped in the fifth-generation Camaro, its 3.73 ratio proved too low for optimal 60-foot times when combined with the eight-speed automatic transmission from the sixth-gen.

Of course gears and tires will only get you so far. The drag development Camaro also packed some extra power. While the stock Camaro SS produces a healthy 455hp, the Chevrolet Performance head and cam package for the LT1, combined with their cold-air intake and performance exhaust, results in more than 530hp. The team didn’t stop there. Chevrolet is being shy about the details, but additional powertrain mods pushed the LT1 to about 600 hp, which helped it run a best ¼-mile ET of 10.685 seconds at 125.73 mph. Testing continued into 2017 and is still ongoing, as products will roll out shortly to help the gen six Camaro SS hold its own on the dragstrip. Here’s how Chevrolet Performance picked their parts and will be validating them this year to release as actual drag race parts you can buy right out of the Chevrolet Performance catalog.

Tire temperature sensors were used to determine the optimum burnout duration necessary for maximum grip.
Tire temperature sensors were used to determine the optimum burnout duration necessary for maximum grip.
The new torque converter’s stall speed is 4,200rpm, about 30 percent higher than a stock Camaro SS . The ability to launch harder, combined with additional grip, resulted in a best 60-foot time of 1.425 seconds.
The new torque converter’s stall speed is 4,200rpm, about 30 percent higher than a stock Camaro SS . The ability to launch harder, combined with additional grip, resulted in a best 60-foot time of 1.425 seconds.
Final validation for parts includes 200 back-to-back runs on a prepped dragstrip, the same testing process that’s used for the COPO Camaro.
Final validation for parts includes 200 back-to-back runs on a prepped dragstrip, the same testing process that’s used for the COPO Camaro.
Smaller 16-inch diameter wheels were used to fit slicks with some sidewall flex. That mandated smaller diameter brakes as well, which are unique to the drag Camaro.
Smaller 16-inch diameter wheels were used to fit slicks with some sidewall flex. That mandated smaller diameter brakes as well, which are unique to the drag Camaro.
The factory 2.77 gear set used in the automatic transmission sixth-gen Camaro turned out to be the best suited for the hard launches with the high-stall converter and sticky tires.
The factory 2.77 gear set used in the automatic transmission sixth-gen Camaro turned out to be the best suited for the hard launches with the high-stall converter and sticky tires.
The Camaro SS Drag Race Development team recorded more than 300 channels of data, about 100 were powertrain-related, 40 were vehicle-related, and another 30 or so were chassis-related.
The Camaro SS Drag Race Development team recorded more than 300 channels of data, about 100 were powertrain-related, 40 were vehicle-related, and another 30 or so were chassis-related.

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Drivetrain, General Motors, Interesting Stuff