Watch “Offerings to the God of Speed” — Burt Munro’s Bonneville Record set 49 Years ago Today

Burt Munro encapsulated everything there is about hot rodding and land speed racing, even if it was while  racing with two wheels missing. “If a thing’s worth doing, it’s worth finishing if you can,” said Munro. “Lots of people ask me, ‘When are you gonna give up?’ I said I’m not gonna give up until I get a good run!” Munro still holds the AMA Land Speed Record in Class S.A. 1000 record of 184.087, set with his famous, hand-built 953cc 1920 Indian motorcycle streamliner, which some land speed racers will still tell you is cursed.

Munro spent his days selling and repairing motorcycles, and spent his nights building them for land speed racing. He would make connecting rods out of airplane props and tractor axles, build micrometers from wheel spokes, cast his own pistons in tin cans, and worked tirelessly to bring his Indian to Bonneville — even reportedly buying the 1960 Chevy wagon you see him driving in Offerings to the God of Speed in Los Angeles for a whole $90 so that he could tow his Indian to Bonneville. At the time, there wasn’t a speed parts industry like we have today, and Munro, living in New Zealand, would’ve been cut off from most of the world anyhow as shipping would’ve been prohibitively expensive for the modest mechanic, so he always had to be crafty.

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The World’s Fastest Indian was written and directed by Australian Roger Donaldson, who also created this 1971 TV documentary. Burt Munro: Offerings to the God of Speed is one of the last looks into Munro’s life, and it really chisels into the character of Munro. Relentless optimism, a wealth of creativity, and never being short of confidence are the tenants of Munro, along with his famous offerings to the God of Speed — a shelf of cracked pistons, splintered connecting rods, and pizza-cut flywheels.

Munro would go on to be inducted in the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 2006for those sacrifices, too.

Of course, the real secret about Munro’s record at Bonneville is that 184.087 mph was not the original record, as the original 183.59 mph two-run average was miscalculated in 1967, and Munro was reissued a new AMA Land Speed Record in Class S.A. 1000 record certificate in 2014 — 36 years after his death in 1978!

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Automotive History, Events, Interesting Stuff, Videos

Is This Wild 1970 Plymouth Barracuda the Most Famous Muscle Car that Never Existed?

Tim Wellborn has been hooked on the Mopar brands for decades. He recalls accompanying his father during a trip to the local Dodge dealership in Talladega, Alabama, to trade in a used 1967 Charger for a new 1970 model. A salesperson told Doug Wellborn about the totally new design coming for the 1971 Charger, and he opted to wait it out.

Tim was 12 at the time. While at the Dodge dealership, he came across a copy of the Rapid Transit System brochure his father had picked up. Plymouth had put out the brochure to target the high-performance end of the muscle car community, and it drew attention to Plymouth’s hottest models as well as accessories to make them even hotter. “Anybody can offer a car,” teased the brochure. “Only Plymouth offers a system.”

A particular picture in the brochure threw young Tim for a loop. Before his eyes was a ‘Cuda striped with 25 colors of paint, plus a wheelie bar, zoomie headers, a rollbar, and drag racing slicks. It was unlike any car he’d ever seen. Little did he know just how much of an impression that ‘Cuda had made on him.

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Four decades later, Tim and his wife Pam opened the Wellborn Muscle Car Museum in Alexander City, Alabama. His collection of muscle car information, specifically Chrysler/Plymouth/Dodge literature and brochures, had grown during the years, only to be rivaled by his collection of Mopar muscle cars.

While going through a stack of brochures for inclusion in the museum archives, he came across an original copy of that Rapid Transit System brochure that caught his eye all those years ago. He turned to page 11 and was again entranced by the Hemi 1970 Plymouth Barracuda and the one-of-kind striped paint scheme. While experiencing a vivid sense of déjà vu, he wondered, had it ever been built?

Not long after rediscovering the brochure, Tim set out to see if a real version had ever been produced by Plymouth. His research revealed it had not, and to date no one else had built one either. “That was about to change,” he says now.

Tim and Pam put a plan in place to find a 1970 ‘Cuda worthy of being transformed into an exact duplicate of the one in the Rapid Transit System brochure, including the period-correct speed parts.

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Their search for a solid, rust-free southern car ended in July 2016 when The Bomb Factory discovered a pristine example in a New Orleans warehouse. It had been hidden away for two decades and still had the original drivetrain. The ‘Cuda was in fantastic shape and the perfect candidate for the project. It was taken to The Bomb Factory’s resto shop in New Orleans for the transformation. Charles Handler and Trey Hansen agreed to take on the task of doing the hands-on work for their new History Channel Program Big Easy Motors.

Working behind the scenes, master mechanic Daniel Boshears was summoned to get the ‘Cuda up and running. After working his magic the Mopar was purring, even though it had sat idle for nearly 20 years. Daniel is the mechanic for the Wellborn Museum. He tests and tunes every vehicle in the collection.

In fact, his assessment of the ‘Cuda gave Tim and Pam pause about moving forward with the paint-chip idea. “This is one of the best handing E-Bodies I’ve ever driven,” Daniel told them. “It’s solid without a rattle, rolls down the highway straight as an arrow, and takes a corner with ease. The engine is strong, and the four-speed transmission goes through the gears like it’s new.”

Working with Handler and Hansen, a plan was created to preserve the original sheetmetal and trim. The 25-color paint scheme would be applied using a process to protect the car’s original surface. Tim also wanted to make sure that any work done on the car wouldn’t prevent it from being returned to its factory-correct state.

1970-plymouth-barracuda-rear

How was that accomplished? With a great amount of care and craftsmanship, a white plastic automobile body wrap was applied, then used as a basecoat layer much like a painted body sealer. The wrap was applied only to the passenger side of the car using the peak of the Shaker hood as the dividing line. Even the original black vinyl top took on the white body wrap.

Next, each of the 25 colors was applied one at a time with a special paint product formulated by BASF and the RM brand. A black tape stripe covers the seam break line where the colors meet. The look is clean and professional, amazing to see in person, and even more so when you realize that under all those colors is the undisturbed Ivy Green (EF8) factory finish, protected by the body wrap.

Sticking with the plan to not alter the original ‘Cuda meant that all of the additional items had to be installed in a way to allow them to be removed without damaging the sheetmetal, trim, or paint. It is amazing to see the wheelie bar, four-tube header exhaust, and passenger-side half-rollbar installed in a nonintrusive manner.

1970-plymouth-barracuda-brochure-page

The ‘Cuda was not originally equipped with the Shaker hood option. It was added and the original hood stowed away for safe keeping. The front grille was cleaned up and given a fresh coat of paint. Under the hood is the car’s numbers-matching 383 V-8, backed by a four-speed transmission with Pistol-Grip shifter.

“Seeing this car become reality, with that wild, psychedelic paint scheme and drag-car stance, is just surreal,” Tim says. “It’s possibly the most famous car never built. Pam and I are excited to add it to our muscle car collection, and it’s going to be a hit at the museum.”

The car’s transformation will be featured on Big Easy Motors, and Tim plans to display the ‘Cuda at the SEMA Show in Las Vegas, followed by MCACN in Chicago. The Bomb Factory’s Charles Handler and Trey Hansen will be on hand at MCACN to talk with show goers and sign autographs. This will be a must-see car at what is already a must-see event.

At a Glance
1970 Paint Chip ‘Cuda
Owned by: Tim and Pam Wellborn, Alexander City, AL
Restored by: The Bomb Factory, New Orleans, LA
Engine: 383ci/335hp V-8
Transmission: 4-speed manual
Rearend: 8 3/4 with 3.55 gears
Interior: Black vinyl bucket seat
Tires: G60-15 Goodyear Polyglas GT (driver side); 5.50-15 Pro Trac front, 29.5×10 Towel City Cheater Slick rear (passenger side)
Wheels: 15-inch Rallye (driver side); 15×4 Rocket Fuel front, 15×10 Rocket Injector rear (passenger side)
Special parts: Multicolored body wrap to replicate “paint chip” car in Rapid Transit brochure, in addition to add-on speed parts on the passenger side of car


1970-plymouth-barracuda-stock-side-front-three-quarter

The ‘Cuda that the guys at the Bomb Factory found for Tim Wellborn’s intended transformation was in such good shape that Tim didn’t want to harm it in any way. All the add-ons—including the body wrap—can be removed to return the entire car it to what it looks like on the driver side.

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The peak of the Shaker hood was used as the break line between the paint-chip body wrap and the stock finish.

1970-plymouth-barracuda-engine

Under the hood is the car’s born-with 383. It wasn’t originally fitted with the Shaker, but Tim had one in his parts collection, and the Bomb Factory added it to match the rendering in the brochure. The original dual-scoop hood is safely in storage.

1970-plymouth-barracuda-rear-quarter

None of the factory sheetmetal was disturbed to stuff the racing slick in, nor were modifications made to the factory axle. The wheelie bar, too, was carefully mounted so it could be removed should Tim want to take the car back to stock.

1970-plymouth-barracuda-hemi-decal

1970-plymouth-barracuda-383-decal

After the paint-chip stripes were applied to the white body wrap, a Hemi decal was affixed to the passenger-side rear fender. The driver-side fender has the car’s accurate 383 callout.

1970-plymouth-barracuda-rollbar

It took some engineering on the Bomb Factory’s part to install half a rollbar!

1970-plymouth-barracuda-interior

Other than a few add-on gauges, the car is stock ‘Cuda inside. The view over the hood is sure different, though.

1970-plymouth-barracuda-front-fender

The Bomb Factory did an amazing job applying the paint stripes to the white plastic body wrap. Black tape separates the colors. At least one of the 1970 colors is not represented on the ‘Cuda; can you figure out what’s missing?

1970-plymouth-barracuda-stripe-side-front-three-quarter1970-plymouth-barracuda-stock-side-front-three-quarter

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Automotive History, Interesting Stuff, Mopar

One-Wheeled Wonder – Turbo Mustang Nearly Flips

Small-tire racing has hit a fever with events like Resurection 2 at North Carolina’s Piedmont Dragway. The racing is always exciting, and not just for the battle for the finish line. This turbo Mustang reared up onto the bumper with during a wheelie, eventually unloading the axle entirely. Remember how we said small-tire is exciting to watch?

With most small-tire races rules excluding wheelie bars, the driver has to rely on his suspension and drivetrain tuning to keep that nose planted. Despite the crash landing, which actually deflated the rear-righthand slick, the driver is able to safely pull off track.

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Ford, Interesting Stuff, Racing News, Videos

Brittany Force Finds Footing in Top Fuel With her Third Career Win at Brainerd

With the blown motor, Brittany Force crossed the finish line at the Lucas Oil NHRA Nationals to earn her third win of the year — and her Top Fuel career. She took her first win at the 2016 NHRA Gatornationals, and proved it was no fluke during the following NHRA Four-Wide Nationals, but has seen a bit of a mid-season slump during the summer.

Force, who took up Top Fuel in 2013, picked up the weekend’s Elimination rounds from a healthy third-place qualifying position, and had clean passes against Doug Kalitta, Terry Haddock, and Shawn Langdon, and faced Antron Brown in the final, after Brown collected a belated win for the delayed finish of the Save the Harvest Nationals. Brown lit the tires by mid-track, but Force was able to hold it together longer before pulling the chutes early for her third career win.

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Interesting Stuff, Racing News, Videos

Larry Larson Feeds his S-10 Corn at the Street Car Takeover Ethanol Nationals

Street Car Takeover ran their first annual Ethanol Nationals this last July, an ethanol-only event that took place between cornfields at the Kearney Raceway Park, in Kearney, Nebraska. Larry Larson ran his S-10 in the top class, King of the Corn, for a $30,000 purse.

This meant Larson ran the S-10 on ethanol for the first time, as the truck typically runs a dual-fuel system that switches between methanol and pump gas. With a bit of tweaking on the air/fuel ratio and timing curve to acclimate the S-10 to corn alcohol, Larson had the S-10 dialed in as it battled rounds of big-tire madness. Hell, after the final, Larson had enough time to pick some corn before heading back down the return lane — because, why not?
Larson Corn 1320 Ethanol Nationals

Source: hotrod.com
Posted in Events, General Motors, Interesting Stuff, Racing News

Identifying Coyote Motors

 

When Ford introduced the 5.0L Ti-VCT (Twin Independent Variable Camshaft Timing) V-8, better known as the Coyote, it was an immediate success with Mustang fans, and when Ford Performance introduced them as a crate engine they were a hit with hot rodders as well. Dean Livermore at Hot Rods by Dean has been involved in a number of Coyote conversions and he and his crew managed to shoehorn one into our ARP/STREET RODDER Road Tour 1966 Ford Fairlane.

Ford created the Coyote from a blank sheet of paper, or maybe we should say an empty computer screen. In any case, Ford’s new engine was a truly modern all-aluminum four-valve DOHC V-8. With a bore of 3.629 inches and a stroke of 3.649, displacement is roughly 302 ci or 5.0-liters (actually 301.95 ci or 4.9-liters, but 302 and 5.0L sounded better). Weighing in at a scant 444 pounds, these new cammers churned out 412 hp at 6,500 rpm, 390 lo-fi of torque at 4,250 rpm when first installed in Mustangs. Along with impressive performance these new engines posted surprising mileage numbers—17/26-mpg city/highway with a six-speed manual, and 18/25 with the automatic, so every number they made was impressive.

Differences in the Breed
For clarification, 2011-2014 Coyotes are Gen I engines; 2015 are Gen II. According to Ford most of the improvements to 2015 Coyote (or Gen II Coyote) focus on allowing it to breathe better. Those Gen II Coyote improvements include:
• Larger intake valves
• Larger exhaust valves
• Revised intake camshafts
• Revised exhaust camshafts
• Stiffer valvesprings to ensure that the valves close completely at high rpm
• New cylinder-head casting, including revised ports that provide a straighter path to the valves for less-restrictive intake and exhaust flow and combustion chamber modifications to accommodate larger valves
•A new intake manifold features charge motion control valves to partially close off port flow at lower engine speeds. This increases the air charge tumble and swirl for improved air/fuel mixing, resulting in better fuel economy, idle stability, and lower emissions.
•On the intake side, variable camshaft timing now has mid-lock phasers allowing better control of the valve timing over a broader range of engine.

Additional changes include:
• Sinter forged connecting rods that were used on the Boss 302 engine that are more durable for high-rpm operation
• Redesigned piston tops with deeper cutouts to clear the new larger valves
• Rebalanced forged crankshaft that supports higher-rpm operation
• Gen II blocks use 11mm head bolts

Oiling System
All the improvements made in the Gen II Coyote impact performance, and there are some changes that directly impact how these engines are installed. Of critical importance in this regard are the changes in the Gen II oiling system. Gen II blocks have an added oil return and require the matching Gen II OFA (oil filter adaptor) to mount the spin-on filter. Gen II blocks can be used for builds with Gen I or II components as long as the Gen II OFA is used.

Proper Plumbing of a Remote-Mount Oil Filter
Oil filters have an internal one-way check valve so it is crucial that remote filters are plumbed correctly. If the oil lines are hooked up backward, oil flow to the engine is stopped and engine failure will result.
When using a remote oil filter adapter, the top hole delivers oil from the remote mount oil filter adapter into the engine. The bottom hole delivers oil coming out of the engine to the filter (oil port A is in, B out).
Ford also cautions that due to the high oil demands of this engine, nothing less than -10 lines and fittings are used. In addition, use only radius-type fittings if a bend is needed. A 45-degree radius bend creates less restriction than a 90-degree radius bend.

Proper Priming of the 5.0L DOHC Engine
Unlike the earlier pushrod equipped engines, the Coyote doesn’t have an oil pump driveshaft that can be spun to prime the oiling system—and these engine cannot be primed by spinning them with the starter. The only proper pre-lube procedure for a Coyote is the use of a pressurized tank.

Ford’s instructions on priming the oil system are very specific and must be followed to prevent engine damage:

When Using an Aftermarket Remote-Mount Oil Filter
“Check and note oil level on dipstick. With oil filter installed, remove lower line from block adapter oil port “B.” Using proper adapters, attach engine pre-lube tank to the oil line removed from oil port “B.” Following the engine pre-lube tank manufacturer’s instructions, prime the engine.
Remove pre-lube tank from oil line and attach oil line to block adapter. Check oil level—if engine was properly primed, the level will have risen. It may take a few minutes for the oil to drain down to the pan. Drain excess oil if necessary.”

Priming the Engine with the Oil Filter in the Stock Location
“Check and note oil level on dipstick. With oil filter installed and full of oil, remove oil pressure sending unit. Using proper adapters, attach engine pre-lube tank to the port that the sending unit was screwed into. Following the engine pre-lube tank manufacturer’s instructions, prime the engine. Check oil level—if engine was properly primed, the level will have risen. It may take a few minutes for the oil to drain down to the pan. Drain excess oil if necessary.
Remove engine pre-lube tank from filter adapter. Apply sealant to the threads of the oil pressure sending unit. Reinstall and torque to 14 Nm, then rotate an additional 180 degrees.”

Coolant Flow
How a Coyote cools is a critical issue. Ford cautions “If a heater circuit is not used then the heater supply must be connected to the heater return to allow air to be purged from the right hand cylinder head and provide sufficient coolant flow through the righthand cylinder head. Install a 5/16-inch-diameter (0.3125) restrictor in this hose.”

Microsoft Word - FM121102 M-6007-A50NA Inst Sheet.4.20.12

To ensure that coolant flows through the righthand head at all times Hot Rods by Dean can provide a heater valve that diverts coolant into the engine when the heater is in the “off” position.

Fairlane Fitment
Thanks to the Roadster Shop chassis and the redesigned engine compartment by Hot Rods by Dean the tiny Fairlane engine compartment was made big enough to accommodate the larger than most Coyote V-8.
While the engine remains stock internally, with the notable exception of lockout plates on the variable timing camshafts, the most obvious modification is the wild custom induction system. Hot Rods by Dean fabricated the intake manifold and then equipped it with Inglese eight-stack, 50mm, throttle-body injectors controlled by a FAST computer, while the engine management system is a FAST XFI Sportsman ECU. Aeromotive supplied the fuel pump, filters, pressure regulator, and lines.
To get the engine low enough in the chassis for the new induction system to clear the hood, Hot Rods by Dean fabricated the custom engine mounts and swapped the stock pan and pickup for parts from Moroso. Spent gases are removed by headers from PerTronix that were designed to fit street rod applications—the collector on the right side required minor surgery to fit the Fairlane but that’s all part of putting 10 pounds of stuff in a 2-pound bag. The remainder of the exhaust system is made up from pipes and those sweet-sounding mufflers from Flowmaster that gives our Road Tour car that unmistakable rumble.

Under the hood of the ARP/STREET RODDER Fairlane is a Ford Coyote V-8 that not only looks impressive but also has the performance to match. Ford’s 5.0L Ti-VCT, aka the Coyote, first appeared in 2011. For 2015 it was refined and improved.
Under the hood of the ARP/STREET RODDER Fairlane is a Ford Coyote V-8 that not only looks impressive but also has the performance to match. Ford’s 5.0L Ti-VCT, aka the Coyote, first appeared in 2011. For 2015 it was refined and improved.
With the intrusive front suspension and spring towers replaced with a Roadster Shop IFS-equipped chassis, the once-tiny engine compartment was able to accept the king-size Coyote.
With the intrusive front suspension and spring towers replaced with a Roadster Shop IFS-equipped chassis, the once-tiny engine compartment was able to accept the king-size Coyote.
Hot Rods by Dean fashioned new inner fender panels, smoothed the firewall, and built a custom transmission tunnel. Note the louvers in the side panels to help hot air escape the engine compartment.
Hot Rods by Dean fashioned new inner fender panels, smoothed the firewall, and built a custom transmission tunnel. Note the louvers in the side panels to help hot air escape the engine compartment.
The first step in building the custom eight-stack injection system was removing the stock intake and fabricating aluminum base plates for the new manifold. The first of the pair can be seen on the left.
The first step in building the custom eight-stack injection system was removing the stock intake and fabricating aluminum base plates for the new manifold. The first of the pair can be seen on the left.
Dean and crew went to great lengths keeping the new induction system clean looking. The Inglese linkage and bellcrank assembly is hidden under the cross-ram manifold.
Dean and crew went to great lengths keeping the new induction system clean looking. The Inglese linkage and bellcrank assembly is hidden under the cross-ram manifold.
This is the new intake manifold under construction. The base plates and lower portions of the tubes are in place and the throttle body flanges are mocked up in their places.
This is the new intake manifold under construction. The base plates and lower portions of the tubes are in place and the throttle body flanges are mocked up in their places.
While all the welding on the manifold was being completed the tubes were tack welded together. They were later removed to allow for expansion and contraction during the engine’s heating and cooling cycles.
While all the welding on the manifold was being completed the tubes were tack welded together. They were later removed to allow for expansion and contraction during the engine’s heating and cooling cycles.
Small passages in the intake ports (arrow) supply vacuum to the injection system’s MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor.
Small passages in the intake ports (arrow) supply vacuum to the injection system’s MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor.
This is the FAST MAP sensor and the “manifold” HRBD fabricated to provide the MAP sensor with vacuum signals from all the intake runners.
This is the FAST MAP sensor and the “manifold” HRBD fabricated to provide the MAP sensor with vacuum signals from all the intake runners.
A single TPS (throttle position sensor) mounted to one throttle body provides the necessary information to the FAST ECU.
A single TPS (throttle position sensor) mounted to one throttle body provides the necessary information to the FAST ECU.
The 50mm throttle bodies look trick with the intake bells in place; although they aren’t very practical for the cross-country trips the car will be making.
The 50mm throttle bodies look trick with the intake bells in place; although they aren’t very practical for the cross-country trips the car will be making.
Supplying fuel to our hungry Coyote is an Aeromotive in-tank fuel pump. Lines include the outlet, vent, and return.
Supplying fuel to our hungry Coyote is an Aeromotive in-tank fuel pump. Lines include the outlet, vent, and return.
To ensure a clean fuel supply an Aeromotive filter was attached to the crossmember in front of the fuel tank.
To ensure a clean fuel supply an Aeromotive filter was attached to the crossmember in front of the fuel tank.
A critical fuel system component for EFI is the pressure regulator. HRBD installed an Aeromotive adjustable regulator to ensure fuel pressure stays constant.
A critical fuel system component for EFI is the pressure regulator. HRBD installed an Aeromotive adjustable regulator to ensure fuel pressure stays constant.
To prevent the odor associated with a vented gas tank HRBD installed one of their evaporative control canisters in the trunk.
To prevent the odor associated with a vented gas tank HRBD installed one of their evaporative control canisters in the trunk.
This is a remote oil filter adapter for a Coyote. How the lines are connected depends on the engine series.
This is a remote oil filter adapter for a Coyote. How the lines are connected depends on the engine series.
Our remote filter mounts an AMSOIL INC. filter element. The Road Tour car uses AMSOIL INC. lubricants exclusively.
Our remote filter mounts an AMSOIL INC. filter element. The Road Tour car uses AMSOIL INC. lubricants exclusively.
The Vintage Air front runner mounts the A/C compressor and positions the power steering pump with the pulley to the rear. Note the factory-style tensioner at the bottom. The alternator mounts in the stock location.
The Vintage Air front runner mounts the A/C compressor and positions the power steering pump with the pulley to the rear. Note the factory-style tensioner at the bottom. The alternator mounts in the stock location.
The A/C compressor tucks in tight and low on the right side of the engine.
The A/C compressor tucks in tight and low on the right side of the engine.
To get the engine as low as possible and maintain adequate crossmember and rack-and-pinion steering clearance the stock pan and oil pump pickup were swapped for Moroso parts.
To get the engine as low as possible and maintain adequate crossmember and rack-and-pinion steering clearance the stock pan and oil pump pickup were swapped for Moroso parts.
These universal tight-tuck headers are from PerTronix; the right side collector would undergo minor modification.
These universal tight-tuck headers are from PerTronix; the right side collector would undergo minor modification.
The right side collector was cut off and the remaining section of pipe was trimmed at an angle.
The right side collector was cut off and the remaining section of pipe was trimmed at an angle.
The modified header and Moroso pan cured all our clearance problems. On the left side of the engine the PerTronix header fit perfectly.
The modified header and Moroso pan cured all our clearance problems. On the left side of the engine the PerTronix header fit perfectly.
A Flowmaster kit was used to complete the exhaust system. Note how the pipes and mufflers tuck up inside the frame.
A Flowmaster kit was used to complete the exhaust system. Note how the pipes and mufflers tuck up inside the frame.
HRBD built this custom aluminum box to house the FAST ECUs for the engine and fuel injection along with the transmission controller.
HRBD built this custom aluminum box to house the FAST ECUs for the engine and fuel injection along with the transmission controller.
Speedway Motors supplied the power steering reservoir. It’s mounted in front of the right head.
Speedway Motors supplied the power steering reservoir. It’s mounted in front of the right head.

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Drivetrain, Ford, Interesting Stuff

Victory Lap – Chevy Crushed Woodward Avenue With Massive Camaro Cruise-in

If you have 50 years under your belt building an iconic performance car that’s has been tearing up road courses, drag strips, and main streets of America for decades, you have more than earned the right to flaunt your heritage. That’s exactly what Chevrolet did on the Friday morning before the Woodward Dream Cruise. Camaros from all six generations gathered along the riverfront in downtown Detroit as over 250 owners from 11 states, and Canada, came together for a “Camaros and Coffee” get together.

If you’re going to lead a pack of over 200 Camaros on the streets of Detroit, you’ll need the help of the Michigan State Police. They brought their 1991 B4C Special Service Camaro.
If you’re going to lead a pack of over 200 Camaros on the streets of Detroit, you’ll need the help of the Michigan State Police. They brought their 1991 B4C Special Service Camaro.

After the coffee and donuts were inhaled, it was time to saddle up.The owners started with a victory lap down Woodward Avenue to flaunt their badass Bow Ties, then it was time for the “Camaro Rally;” leading the pack was an original 1991 Michigan State Police B4C Special Service Camaro and a pack of motorcycle cops normally reserved for the President or other visiting dignitaries. The crowds of enthusiasts and sightseers who lined up along Woodward also got the treat of seeing a caravan of Camaros rolling down the fabled avenue that runs through Detroit and out to its northern suburbs. We were also back behind the wheel of the 2017 Camaro SS 50th Anniversary Edition and felt like rock stars as we rolled past GM World Headquarters in Detroit; employees dotted the sidewalk, waving and cheering us on.

Remember, Woodward Avenue was the epicenter for cars, cruising, street racing, and other high-octane activities in the Motor City for over 60 years.

Mark Reuss might be a VP at GM, but he’s a regular car guy that’s passionate about the Camaro. He’s also a good friend with Pro-Touring pioneer and GM engineer Mark Stielow.
Mark Reuss might be a VP at GM, but he’s a regular car guy that’s passionate about the Camaro. He’s also a good friend with Pro-Touring pioneer and GM engineer Mark Stielow.

To give you an idea on how big the Camaros and Coffee event was, Mark Reuss, GM Executive Vice President, was on hand to personally welcome the hundreds of Chevy enthusiasts to the event. Reuss spoke of the importance Camaro has played in the company’s history for 50 years. Reuss was also checking out Mark Stielow’s 1969 Pro-Touring Camaro while doing some bench racing. Other GM big wigs included Al Oppenheiser, chief engineer for Camaro, who was working the crowds and chatting about the upcoming 2017 Camaro ZL1.

Al Oppenheiser, chief engineer for Camaro, is another car guy at GM who makes things like the new ZL1 a reality. He’s an enthusiast to the core.
Al Oppenheiser, chief engineer for Camaro, is another car guy at GM who makes things like the new ZL1 a reality. He’s an enthusiast to the core.

So, check out our awesome photo gallery and video of the Camaros and Coffee/Camaro Rally event. Remember, if you’re going to the Woodward Dream Cruise, go full throttle or just don’t go.

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Events, General Motors, Interesting Stuff, Videos