Larry Larson Feeds his S-10 Corn at the Street Car Takeover Ethanol Nationals

Street Car Takeover ran their first annual Ethanol Nationals this last July, an ethanol-only event that took place between cornfields at the Kearney Raceway Park, in Kearney, Nebraska. Larry Larson ran his S-10 in the top class, King of the Corn, for a $30,000 purse.

This meant Larson ran the S-10 on ethanol for the first time, as the truck typically runs a dual-fuel system that switches between methanol and pump gas. With a bit of tweaking on the air/fuel ratio and timing curve to acclimate the S-10 to corn alcohol, Larson had the S-10 dialed in as it battled rounds of big-tire madness. Hell, after the final, Larson had enough time to pick some corn before heading back down the return lane — because, why not?
Larson Corn 1320 Ethanol Nationals

Source: hotrod.com
Posted in Events, General Motors, Interesting Stuff, Racing News

Identifying Coyote Motors

 

When Ford introduced the 5.0L Ti-VCT (Twin Independent Variable Camshaft Timing) V-8, better known as the Coyote, it was an immediate success with Mustang fans, and when Ford Performance introduced them as a crate engine they were a hit with hot rodders as well. Dean Livermore at Hot Rods by Dean has been involved in a number of Coyote conversions and he and his crew managed to shoehorn one into our ARP/STREET RODDER Road Tour 1966 Ford Fairlane.

Ford created the Coyote from a blank sheet of paper, or maybe we should say an empty computer screen. In any case, Ford’s new engine was a truly modern all-aluminum four-valve DOHC V-8. With a bore of 3.629 inches and a stroke of 3.649, displacement is roughly 302 ci or 5.0-liters (actually 301.95 ci or 4.9-liters, but 302 and 5.0L sounded better). Weighing in at a scant 444 pounds, these new cammers churned out 412 hp at 6,500 rpm, 390 lo-fi of torque at 4,250 rpm when first installed in Mustangs. Along with impressive performance these new engines posted surprising mileage numbers—17/26-mpg city/highway with a six-speed manual, and 18/25 with the automatic, so every number they made was impressive.

Differences in the Breed
For clarification, 2011-2014 Coyotes are Gen I engines; 2015 are Gen II. According to Ford most of the improvements to 2015 Coyote (or Gen II Coyote) focus on allowing it to breathe better. Those Gen II Coyote improvements include:
• Larger intake valves
• Larger exhaust valves
• Revised intake camshafts
• Revised exhaust camshafts
• Stiffer valvesprings to ensure that the valves close completely at high rpm
• New cylinder-head casting, including revised ports that provide a straighter path to the valves for less-restrictive intake and exhaust flow and combustion chamber modifications to accommodate larger valves
•A new intake manifold features charge motion control valves to partially close off port flow at lower engine speeds. This increases the air charge tumble and swirl for improved air/fuel mixing, resulting in better fuel economy, idle stability, and lower emissions.
•On the intake side, variable camshaft timing now has mid-lock phasers allowing better control of the valve timing over a broader range of engine.

Additional changes include:
• Sinter forged connecting rods that were used on the Boss 302 engine that are more durable for high-rpm operation
• Redesigned piston tops with deeper cutouts to clear the new larger valves
• Rebalanced forged crankshaft that supports higher-rpm operation
• Gen II blocks use 11mm head bolts

Oiling System
All the improvements made in the Gen II Coyote impact performance, and there are some changes that directly impact how these engines are installed. Of critical importance in this regard are the changes in the Gen II oiling system. Gen II blocks have an added oil return and require the matching Gen II OFA (oil filter adaptor) to mount the spin-on filter. Gen II blocks can be used for builds with Gen I or II components as long as the Gen II OFA is used.

Proper Plumbing of a Remote-Mount Oil Filter
Oil filters have an internal one-way check valve so it is crucial that remote filters are plumbed correctly. If the oil lines are hooked up backward, oil flow to the engine is stopped and engine failure will result.
When using a remote oil filter adapter, the top hole delivers oil from the remote mount oil filter adapter into the engine. The bottom hole delivers oil coming out of the engine to the filter (oil port A is in, B out).
Ford also cautions that due to the high oil demands of this engine, nothing less than -10 lines and fittings are used. In addition, use only radius-type fittings if a bend is needed. A 45-degree radius bend creates less restriction than a 90-degree radius bend.

Proper Priming of the 5.0L DOHC Engine
Unlike the earlier pushrod equipped engines, the Coyote doesn’t have an oil pump driveshaft that can be spun to prime the oiling system—and these engine cannot be primed by spinning them with the starter. The only proper pre-lube procedure for a Coyote is the use of a pressurized tank.

Ford’s instructions on priming the oil system are very specific and must be followed to prevent engine damage:

When Using an Aftermarket Remote-Mount Oil Filter
“Check and note oil level on dipstick. With oil filter installed, remove lower line from block adapter oil port “B.” Using proper adapters, attach engine pre-lube tank to the oil line removed from oil port “B.” Following the engine pre-lube tank manufacturer’s instructions, prime the engine.
Remove pre-lube tank from oil line and attach oil line to block adapter. Check oil level—if engine was properly primed, the level will have risen. It may take a few minutes for the oil to drain down to the pan. Drain excess oil if necessary.”

Priming the Engine with the Oil Filter in the Stock Location
“Check and note oil level on dipstick. With oil filter installed and full of oil, remove oil pressure sending unit. Using proper adapters, attach engine pre-lube tank to the port that the sending unit was screwed into. Following the engine pre-lube tank manufacturer’s instructions, prime the engine. Check oil level—if engine was properly primed, the level will have risen. It may take a few minutes for the oil to drain down to the pan. Drain excess oil if necessary.
Remove engine pre-lube tank from filter adapter. Apply sealant to the threads of the oil pressure sending unit. Reinstall and torque to 14 Nm, then rotate an additional 180 degrees.”

Coolant Flow
How a Coyote cools is a critical issue. Ford cautions “If a heater circuit is not used then the heater supply must be connected to the heater return to allow air to be purged from the right hand cylinder head and provide sufficient coolant flow through the righthand cylinder head. Install a 5/16-inch-diameter (0.3125) restrictor in this hose.”

Microsoft Word - FM121102 M-6007-A50NA Inst Sheet.4.20.12

To ensure that coolant flows through the righthand head at all times Hot Rods by Dean can provide a heater valve that diverts coolant into the engine when the heater is in the “off” position.

Fairlane Fitment
Thanks to the Roadster Shop chassis and the redesigned engine compartment by Hot Rods by Dean the tiny Fairlane engine compartment was made big enough to accommodate the larger than most Coyote V-8.
While the engine remains stock internally, with the notable exception of lockout plates on the variable timing camshafts, the most obvious modification is the wild custom induction system. Hot Rods by Dean fabricated the intake manifold and then equipped it with Inglese eight-stack, 50mm, throttle-body injectors controlled by a FAST computer, while the engine management system is a FAST XFI Sportsman ECU. Aeromotive supplied the fuel pump, filters, pressure regulator, and lines.
To get the engine low enough in the chassis for the new induction system to clear the hood, Hot Rods by Dean fabricated the custom engine mounts and swapped the stock pan and pickup for parts from Moroso. Spent gases are removed by headers from PerTronix that were designed to fit street rod applications—the collector on the right side required minor surgery to fit the Fairlane but that’s all part of putting 10 pounds of stuff in a 2-pound bag. The remainder of the exhaust system is made up from pipes and those sweet-sounding mufflers from Flowmaster that gives our Road Tour car that unmistakable rumble.

Under the hood of the ARP/STREET RODDER Fairlane is a Ford Coyote V-8 that not only looks impressive but also has the performance to match. Ford’s 5.0L Ti-VCT, aka the Coyote, first appeared in 2011. For 2015 it was refined and improved.
Under the hood of the ARP/STREET RODDER Fairlane is a Ford Coyote V-8 that not only looks impressive but also has the performance to match. Ford’s 5.0L Ti-VCT, aka the Coyote, first appeared in 2011. For 2015 it was refined and improved.
With the intrusive front suspension and spring towers replaced with a Roadster Shop IFS-equipped chassis, the once-tiny engine compartment was able to accept the king-size Coyote.
With the intrusive front suspension and spring towers replaced with a Roadster Shop IFS-equipped chassis, the once-tiny engine compartment was able to accept the king-size Coyote.
Hot Rods by Dean fashioned new inner fender panels, smoothed the firewall, and built a custom transmission tunnel. Note the louvers in the side panels to help hot air escape the engine compartment.
Hot Rods by Dean fashioned new inner fender panels, smoothed the firewall, and built a custom transmission tunnel. Note the louvers in the side panels to help hot air escape the engine compartment.
The first step in building the custom eight-stack injection system was removing the stock intake and fabricating aluminum base plates for the new manifold. The first of the pair can be seen on the left.
The first step in building the custom eight-stack injection system was removing the stock intake and fabricating aluminum base plates for the new manifold. The first of the pair can be seen on the left.
Dean and crew went to great lengths keeping the new induction system clean looking. The Inglese linkage and bellcrank assembly is hidden under the cross-ram manifold.
Dean and crew went to great lengths keeping the new induction system clean looking. The Inglese linkage and bellcrank assembly is hidden under the cross-ram manifold.
This is the new intake manifold under construction. The base plates and lower portions of the tubes are in place and the throttle body flanges are mocked up in their places.
This is the new intake manifold under construction. The base plates and lower portions of the tubes are in place and the throttle body flanges are mocked up in their places.
While all the welding on the manifold was being completed the tubes were tack welded together. They were later removed to allow for expansion and contraction during the engine’s heating and cooling cycles.
While all the welding on the manifold was being completed the tubes were tack welded together. They were later removed to allow for expansion and contraction during the engine’s heating and cooling cycles.
Small passages in the intake ports (arrow) supply vacuum to the injection system’s MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor.
Small passages in the intake ports (arrow) supply vacuum to the injection system’s MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor.
This is the FAST MAP sensor and the “manifold” HRBD fabricated to provide the MAP sensor with vacuum signals from all the intake runners.
This is the FAST MAP sensor and the “manifold” HRBD fabricated to provide the MAP sensor with vacuum signals from all the intake runners.
A single TPS (throttle position sensor) mounted to one throttle body provides the necessary information to the FAST ECU.
A single TPS (throttle position sensor) mounted to one throttle body provides the necessary information to the FAST ECU.
The 50mm throttle bodies look trick with the intake bells in place; although they aren’t very practical for the cross-country trips the car will be making.
The 50mm throttle bodies look trick with the intake bells in place; although they aren’t very practical for the cross-country trips the car will be making.
Supplying fuel to our hungry Coyote is an Aeromotive in-tank fuel pump. Lines include the outlet, vent, and return.
Supplying fuel to our hungry Coyote is an Aeromotive in-tank fuel pump. Lines include the outlet, vent, and return.
To ensure a clean fuel supply an Aeromotive filter was attached to the crossmember in front of the fuel tank.
To ensure a clean fuel supply an Aeromotive filter was attached to the crossmember in front of the fuel tank.
A critical fuel system component for EFI is the pressure regulator. HRBD installed an Aeromotive adjustable regulator to ensure fuel pressure stays constant.
A critical fuel system component for EFI is the pressure regulator. HRBD installed an Aeromotive adjustable regulator to ensure fuel pressure stays constant.
To prevent the odor associated with a vented gas tank HRBD installed one of their evaporative control canisters in the trunk.
To prevent the odor associated with a vented gas tank HRBD installed one of their evaporative control canisters in the trunk.
This is a remote oil filter adapter for a Coyote. How the lines are connected depends on the engine series.
This is a remote oil filter adapter for a Coyote. How the lines are connected depends on the engine series.
Our remote filter mounts an AMSOIL INC. filter element. The Road Tour car uses AMSOIL INC. lubricants exclusively.
Our remote filter mounts an AMSOIL INC. filter element. The Road Tour car uses AMSOIL INC. lubricants exclusively.
The Vintage Air front runner mounts the A/C compressor and positions the power steering pump with the pulley to the rear. Note the factory-style tensioner at the bottom. The alternator mounts in the stock location.
The Vintage Air front runner mounts the A/C compressor and positions the power steering pump with the pulley to the rear. Note the factory-style tensioner at the bottom. The alternator mounts in the stock location.
The A/C compressor tucks in tight and low on the right side of the engine.
The A/C compressor tucks in tight and low on the right side of the engine.
To get the engine as low as possible and maintain adequate crossmember and rack-and-pinion steering clearance the stock pan and oil pump pickup were swapped for Moroso parts.
To get the engine as low as possible and maintain adequate crossmember and rack-and-pinion steering clearance the stock pan and oil pump pickup were swapped for Moroso parts.
These universal tight-tuck headers are from PerTronix; the right side collector would undergo minor modification.
These universal tight-tuck headers are from PerTronix; the right side collector would undergo minor modification.
The right side collector was cut off and the remaining section of pipe was trimmed at an angle.
The right side collector was cut off and the remaining section of pipe was trimmed at an angle.
The modified header and Moroso pan cured all our clearance problems. On the left side of the engine the PerTronix header fit perfectly.
The modified header and Moroso pan cured all our clearance problems. On the left side of the engine the PerTronix header fit perfectly.
A Flowmaster kit was used to complete the exhaust system. Note how the pipes and mufflers tuck up inside the frame.
A Flowmaster kit was used to complete the exhaust system. Note how the pipes and mufflers tuck up inside the frame.
HRBD built this custom aluminum box to house the FAST ECUs for the engine and fuel injection along with the transmission controller.
HRBD built this custom aluminum box to house the FAST ECUs for the engine and fuel injection along with the transmission controller.
Speedway Motors supplied the power steering reservoir. It’s mounted in front of the right head.
Speedway Motors supplied the power steering reservoir. It’s mounted in front of the right head.

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Drivetrain, Ford, Interesting Stuff

Victory Lap – Chevy Crushed Woodward Avenue With Massive Camaro Cruise-in

If you have 50 years under your belt building an iconic performance car that’s has been tearing up road courses, drag strips, and main streets of America for decades, you have more than earned the right to flaunt your heritage. That’s exactly what Chevrolet did on the Friday morning before the Woodward Dream Cruise. Camaros from all six generations gathered along the riverfront in downtown Detroit as over 250 owners from 11 states, and Canada, came together for a “Camaros and Coffee” get together.

If you’re going to lead a pack of over 200 Camaros on the streets of Detroit, you’ll need the help of the Michigan State Police. They brought their 1991 B4C Special Service Camaro.
If you’re going to lead a pack of over 200 Camaros on the streets of Detroit, you’ll need the help of the Michigan State Police. They brought their 1991 B4C Special Service Camaro.

After the coffee and donuts were inhaled, it was time to saddle up.The owners started with a victory lap down Woodward Avenue to flaunt their badass Bow Ties, then it was time for the “Camaro Rally;” leading the pack was an original 1991 Michigan State Police B4C Special Service Camaro and a pack of motorcycle cops normally reserved for the President or other visiting dignitaries. The crowds of enthusiasts and sightseers who lined up along Woodward also got the treat of seeing a caravan of Camaros rolling down the fabled avenue that runs through Detroit and out to its northern suburbs. We were also back behind the wheel of the 2017 Camaro SS 50th Anniversary Edition and felt like rock stars as we rolled past GM World Headquarters in Detroit; employees dotted the sidewalk, waving and cheering us on.

Remember, Woodward Avenue was the epicenter for cars, cruising, street racing, and other high-octane activities in the Motor City for over 60 years.

Mark Reuss might be a VP at GM, but he’s a regular car guy that’s passionate about the Camaro. He’s also a good friend with Pro-Touring pioneer and GM engineer Mark Stielow.
Mark Reuss might be a VP at GM, but he’s a regular car guy that’s passionate about the Camaro. He’s also a good friend with Pro-Touring pioneer and GM engineer Mark Stielow.

To give you an idea on how big the Camaros and Coffee event was, Mark Reuss, GM Executive Vice President, was on hand to personally welcome the hundreds of Chevy enthusiasts to the event. Reuss spoke of the importance Camaro has played in the company’s history for 50 years. Reuss was also checking out Mark Stielow’s 1969 Pro-Touring Camaro while doing some bench racing. Other GM big wigs included Al Oppenheiser, chief engineer for Camaro, who was working the crowds and chatting about the upcoming 2017 Camaro ZL1.

Al Oppenheiser, chief engineer for Camaro, is another car guy at GM who makes things like the new ZL1 a reality. He’s an enthusiast to the core.
Al Oppenheiser, chief engineer for Camaro, is another car guy at GM who makes things like the new ZL1 a reality. He’s an enthusiast to the core.

So, check out our awesome photo gallery and video of the Camaros and Coffee/Camaro Rally event. Remember, if you’re going to the Woodward Dream Cruise, go full throttle or just don’t go.

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Events, General Motors, Interesting Stuff, Videos

Car Craft New Product Spotlight: Speedmaster Camshaft Beltdrives

<img src=”http://st.hotrod.com/uploads/sites/21/2016/08/002-new-products-car-craft-speedmaster-belt-drives-valvetrain-harmonics-660×431.jpg” class=”wp-post-image wp-post-image” alt=”002 New Products Car Craft Speedmaster Belt Drives Valvetrain Harmonics 660×431″ itemprop=”contentUrl” />

What it is: Speedmaster beltdrives.

Why you care: We don’t know about you, but we sure want beltdrives designed to absorb a notable amount of crankshaft harmonics—valve motion gets affected if this reaches the valvetrain. These Speedmaster systems need less power to operate than some other regular beltdrives, and they’re durable to boot.

How much: To be determined

Learn more: Speedmaster; (909)605-1123, www.speedmaster79.com

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Interesting Stuff, New Parts, Parts Highlight, Stuff For Sale

Dave Dudek’s 840HP, 498CI 1969 Plymouth Road Runner

“I just love the sleeper concept,” said Dave Dudek, owner, builder, and pilot of a 1969 Plymouth Road Runner that runs low-10s and more than 130 mph in a car that looks like it belongs in an ISCA-judged car show. For those unfamiliar, Dudek competes in a series dubbed Factory Appearing Stock Tire (FAST), and its mantra is self-explanatory of its rules. The 4,000-pound muscle car has produced a best of 10.14 at 138 mph on original-type Firestone tires.

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The outward appearance is limited to stock, but what lurks beneath is a sinister, high-tech engine combination that has been refined over the years. The Hemi engine displaces 498 ci while churning out 840 hp on the engine dyno. Dudek worked in conjunction with Best Machine Racing to create this beast as it buzzes to 8,200 rpm, and he hopes to put the Road Runner into the 9s when the weather cools off. It isn’t his first go around with this type of build, as he has been involved in FAST racing since 2000 and this is his fourth car for the series.

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Making horsepower is one thing, but getting it to the ground on a set of vintage tires is a completely different story. The trick is a mix of driving style coupled with simple ignition techniques and a set of balding tires. “I have tried it all,” mused Dudek as he walked us through his world. The Michigan-based racer first suggestion to go fast is driving style and said, “You can’t lay into the gas off the line. The best way to describe it is like putting an egg on top of the pedal and step on it, trying to push the pedal down without breaking the egg.”

Once you get the technique down, the two other tricks he shared are weights in the distributor for the proper ignition-timing curve and a set of balding poly-glass tires. If you are looking to read about an exotic ignition control box, don’t waste your time. According to Dudek, he has tried it all from a few traction-control systems, including one from Davis, and an MSD digital-ignition system. He has come full circle, and a finely tuned distributor from Rev-N-Nator works perfectly, with 1.52 60-foot times as proof.

Dudek relies on a set of Firestone G70-15 tires for his Road Runner, hardly a set of high-performance rubber. “Once they start to going bald, they start hooking,” he proudly explained. When you run the category for as long as Dudek, you tend to try tricks and start investing in odd ways to gain traction. He revealed, “I tried it all, from spray bars in the wheelwells with VHT to a junior chemistry set in my kitchen to soak the tires. I even got tire-softeners from Europe.” None of it worked and simply wearing down a pair of tires seemed to do the trick, saving time and money in the long run.

As the weather cools off, Dudek is chomping at the bit to get out to the East Coast to take a shot at the single digits, making it one of the most unassuming muscle cars we’ve ever seen.
By Mike Galimi / Photos: Mike Galimi and Steve Baur

Short-Block
The factory Hemi block was increased to 498 ci by way of a 4.250-inch-stroke Molnar crankshaft and a 0.070-inch overbore, putting the final bore size at 4.320 inches. The bores are filled with Diamond custom pistons and compression ratio is placed at 14:1. The GRP aluminum rods are 7.100 inches long to connect the pistons to the crankshaft. The oiling system is a highly modified setup that looks factory from outside due to the class rules. A Miloden oil pump delivers the oil and Dudek modified the block with a more efficient oil-return system that includes larger orifices. It keeps the big engine well lubricated as it spins to 8,200 rpm.

Cylinder Heads/Camshaft
The valvetrain is a race-bred setup that is centered on an LSM solid roller camshaft. Dudek wasn’t afraid to share the details, unlike many other hardcore racers. The stick features 0.799-inch lift on both the intake and exhaust while duration is 253/262 degrees at 0.050-inch lift. The lobe separation is kind of wide at 114 degrees. The cylinder heads are, of course, factory 559-M Hemi heads, but Modern Cylinder Head put them through an extensive exercise in its porting room. A set of Xceldyne valves were installed—2.25-inch titanium intake valves and 1.94 stainless-steel exhaust valves. Final flow numbers are 410 cfm for the intake ports and 313 cfm for the exhaust (both measurements were taken at 0.800-inch lift and using 28 inches of water). Ray Barton 1.7:1 roller rocker arms are bolted to the cylinder heads.

Induction
A factory cast-iron intake with two inline four-barrel carburetors is heavily modified. The carburetors were sent to Dale Cubic where each was CNC-ported and now have custom internal components. Cubic brought flow from 625 cfm up to 1,000 cfm and the carbs provide a crisp throttle response and excellent idle qualities. Modern Cylinder Head, using Dudek’s specific design, handled the intake porting. One trick that is hidden is the use of a Star electric-driven vacuum pump, which Dudeck mounted in the trunk.

Fuel System/Ignition
The fuel system is straightforward, with a 4-gallon cell mounted in the trunk with a pair of Holley 160-lph fuel pumps feeding the carburetors. The Road Runner has larger fuel lines, which is legal, but Dudek mentioned that one of his previous FAST race cars ran 9s with the stock 5/16-inch fuel line. The 840hp Hemi engine runs on VP Racing Fuels Q16 gasoline. The ignition system is very basic with Firecore spark-plug wires and a Rev-N-Nator distributor as the two most noteworthy components.

Exhaust
One of the more odd requirements is the use of factory exhaust manifolds, which aren’t known for stellar performances, but Dudek has a tried-and-true technique to make them perform. He bolts on a steel cover to the flange area and then drops the manifolds in a bucket of acid. The manifolds are submerged in the bucket for a few days, depending on the weather, and they emerge 5 pounds lighter. Depending on the engine combination, Dudek will then have the manifolds extrude hone-ported.

Drivetrain
Like the engine, a factory transmission is required and that means a 727 Torque Flite is in service. Godfather Racing is responsible for building the bulletproof transmission. A PTC 9.5-inch torque converter with a 3,400-rpm stall speed sits behind the stroker engine. Dudek spent a considerable amount of time testing different converters before settling on the PTC unit. He said the converter is a crucial component to control the wheel speed due to the severe tire limitations.

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Interesting Stuff, Mopar, Racing News

Racing Around: News from Short Track Racing

WoO Craftsman Late Model Series Will Bring Back Two Major Tracks in 2017

Concord, NC- The World of Outlaws Craftsman Late Model Series will add two major events back to the schedule in 2017. The Prairie Dirt Classic held at Fairbury American Legion Speedway in Illinois and the USA Nationals at Cedar Lake Speedway in Wisconsin have been added to the 2017 summer schedule.

The WoO Craftsman Late Model Series will return to Fairbury American Legion Speedway for the 28th running of the Prairie Dirt Classic weekend to be held July 28 and 29, 2017. Fairbury American Legion Speedway is a ¼ mile semi-banked clay oval in Fairbury, Illinois.

Following the Prairie Dirt Classic, the 30th Annual USA Nationals will be held Aug 3rd-5th, 2017 at Cedar Lake Speedway, a 3/8 mile dirt oval in New Richmond, Wisconsin. For more information on the World of Outlaws Craftsman Late Model Series, visit www.woolms.com/

Tom Savage Promoted to General Manager at Badlands Motor Speedway

Brandon, SD- Badlands Motor Speedway located in Brandon South Dakota has announced the promotion of Tom Savage to General Manager. Over the last year, Savage has been overseeing the day to day operations as assistant general manager. Savage is a Sioux Falls, South Dakota native where he earned a Journalism degree from the University of Sioux Falls in 1992. After college, Savage worked as a director of public relations with the NBA until age 33 when he became the director of public relations for the Indianapolis 500.

For more information on Badlands Motor Speedway, visit www.badlandsmotorspeedway.com

DIRTcar Racing Adds New World Short Track Championship

Weedsport, NY- DIRTcar Racing has announced the addition of The World Short Track Championships. The all-new three day event will be held at The Dirt Track at Charlotte October 20th- 22nd, 2016. Nine divisions will compete for a purse in excess of $120,000. The Event will take place the weekend before the Bad Boy Off Road World of Outlaws World Finals held October 27th-29, 2016. Participating divisions for the World Short Track Championships include DIRTcar/SECA Pro Late Models, DIRTcar UMP Modifieds, DIRTcar Sportsman Modifieds, DIRTcar/SECA Pro Modifieds, 360 Sprint Cars, DIRTcar Pro-Sprints, SECA Crate Sportsman, MMSA Mini-Stocks and FWD/Hornets. For competitor information visit DIRTcar.com

Unity Raceway Has a New Owner

Unity, ME- Unity Raceway located in Unity, Maine has a new owner. George Fernald has purchased Unity Raceway from longtime owner Ralph Nason, who has owned the track for the past 35 years. Unity Raceway is Maine’s longest-standing track according to the Maine Vintage Race Car Association.

Unity Raceway first opened in 1948. Original owner Ed Knowles bought the property from the town of Unity in 1947 and acquired a horse track after it was held by the town due to back taxes owed on the land. The horse track was converted to a dirt stock car track in 1948 and paved in the late 1960’s. Nason bought the track in 1980. The new track owner, George Fernald has leaded Unity Raceway from Nason from 2004-2009 and before that, Fernald raced in the weekly racing events while the Nason family operated it.

Fernald expects for Unity Raceway to be closed for most of the 2017 season to make repairs to the facility, but plans to reopen with a fresh new look for 2018. For more information on Unity Raceway, visit www.unityraceway.info

VP Racing Gets Multi-Year Title Partnership With Gateway Dirt Nationals

St. Louis, MO- VP Racing has signed a multi-year agreement acquiring the title partnership with the Gateway Dirt Nationals. VP Racing Fuels will also be the Official Fuel of the VP Racing Fuels Gateway Dirt Nationals being held Dec 15th-17th, 2016 and will be the exclusive trackside fuel service provider. In addition, VP will also promote its product on-site for customers including VP Madditives and VP Small Engine Fuels and VP Branded gas stations.

For more information on VP Racing Fuels please visit www.VPRACINGFUELS.com and for more information on the VP Racing Fuels Gateway Dirt Nationals visit GatewayDirt.com

USAC 2016 Hall of Fame Inductees Finalized

Speedway, IN- USAC has announced the 2016 class of inductees into the USAC Hall of Fame. Four new inductees will join the eight previously announced inductees to make up the 2016 class of inductees. Drivers Steve Butler, Rick Mears, and Kevin Olson, along with car owner and chief mechanic, Willie Davis have been voted in via on line voting though USAC’s website. The new inductees will join the previously announced eight inductees Russ Clendenen, Jimmy Davies, Bob Higman, Tommy Hinnershitz, Dick King, Pat O’Connor, Tony Stewart and Bob Tattersall.

For more information on the USAC Hall of Fame, visit www.usacracing.com

Source: hotrod.com

Posted in Interesting Stuff

Home-Built Sheet Metal Engine Sets Bonneville Record

When Pete Aardema couldn’t find a short-stroke, big-bore 4-cylinder to meet his class at Bonneville, he built his own. Astute HOT ROD readers will remember the full feature on his home-brewed sheet metal engine, made from tube, plate, and various other bits and pieces of steel and aluminum.

When no one builds the engine you need, build your own. That’s what Pete Aardema and team did.

When no one builds the engine you need, build your own. That’s what Pete Aardema and team did.

We caught up with Pete on the salt at 2016 Bonneville Speed Week where his engine creation was nestled inside the sheet metal of his rear engine modified roadster, parked in SCTA impound no less. Why? Because, the car had just earned a 187 mph record in the FRMR-F class.


“We do it weird” – Pete Aardema


The team’s unique take on horsepower production proved as functional as it is unique. “We’re not engineers,” said Aardema.”We literally took 4 thick pipes and welded them together with some plate.” The engine he and his crew built displaces 3.0-liters via a 4.375-inch bore (courtesy of Chevrolet big-block 4.840-inch bore spacing) and a 3.00-inch stroke Crower crankshaft.

A custom cylinder head, inspired by an Offenhouser Indy motor carries three valves per cylinder and overhead cams. It flows a whopping 540 cfm on the intake side.

A custom cylinder head, inspired by an Offenhouser Indy motor carries three valves per cylinder and overhead cams. It flows a whopping 540 cfm on the intake side.

When you start with a one-off fabricated block, there is a good chance you’ll need a custom cylinder head to go with it. So, that’s exactly what the team did. They gave their creation three valves per cylinder and double overhead camshafts to support massive airflow and rpm. Two 1.875-inch intake valves flow 540 cfm at 0.650-inch lift on the intake side, while a single 1.875-inch exhaust valve exits the spent gasses. Working the valves from above are a pair of Schneider Racing Cams – completely custom, of course – modeled off of an old Offy indy motor. Their duration is 255/263-degrees at .050-inches of tappet lift – big for a V8, huge for a 3.0-liter!

A Ford mechanical water pump, driven by a DC motor provides coolant flow tot the engine.

A Ford mechanical water pump, driven by a DC motor provides coolant flow tot the engine.

While the engine is the star of the show, the rest of the car is nothing short of exceptional as well. The amount of genuine hot-rodder ingenuity is staggering and it is clear that the team montra harkens to “built, not bought. “We like makin’ stuff Pete laughs.

The transmission, a Muncie 4-speed, sports a custom-machined quick change on the back; but, because the unit uses 2 meshing gears, the transmission’s rotation is reversed. Rather than go backward on the salt, the guys retrofitted a front axle from a jeep, flipped it updside down (so that the high pinion became a low pinion), and converted it to a solid axle so that the wheels spin in the right direction.

This homemade aluminum housing supports 2 gears – a quick way to fine-tune the car’s gear ratios.

This homemade aluminum housing supports 2 gears – a quick way to fine-tune the car’s gear ratios.

The team, while happy with their record, is definitely in the hunt for 200 mph. The car had previously run 186 mph at El Mirage, without nitrous, and the addition of a 100 shot on the salt only picked up 1 mph. It was then discovered that the engine had lost significant compression so a rebuild is expected once the engine returns to home base.

Two sets of fuel injectors power the car. One set provides the idle and low speed fuel to the cylinders, while the other (shown) provides fuel directly into the trumpets at wide-open throttle and also supports the 100-shot of nitrous.

Two sets of fuel injectors power the car. One set provides the idle and low speed fuel to the cylinders, while the other (shown) provides fuel directly into the trumpets at wide-open throttle and also supports the 100-shot of nitrous.

The roadster is certaintly a crazy ride, but that’s not all the team has up their sleeves. Aardema, along with Kevin Braun, Kevin Aylesworth and Jeff Johnson are working on a 1200ci V12, called the V1200. The mountain motor was unveiled at last year’s PRI show and the guys are hoping to have it running on a stand very soon. Its expected output: 3000 horsepower.

Because the axle is run upside down, it needs gear oil to be routed to the pinion bearings.

Because the axle is run upside down, it needs gear oil to be routed to the pinion bearings.
Source: hotrod.com
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